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Crocker Wheeler Motor  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 10:10 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Picked this up outside of Toledo last week. 1/6HP, 6V DC, 1000 RPM. As you can see from the pictures, it's a pretty small unit, made after the move to Ampere.

I don't understand the need for the two sets of brushes, they seem to move independent of the each other, at least on the one side of the motor. Also note, no oil cups, they have a cover for the oil, but no cups.

Attached Image (viewed 758 times):

cw1.jpg

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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 10:10 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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cw3.jpg

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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 10:11 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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cw2.jpg

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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 10:26 pm
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Terry Burns
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GREAT FIND !!

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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 10:50 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Some of those dual brush motors were used as voltage converters.

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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 11:10 pm
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Austin B Ko
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What a stunning find there.:cool:  Those Gilberts behind it are awesome too.:up:

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 Posted: Sun Jan 1st, 2012 11:38 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Austin B Ko wrote:
What a stunning find there.:cool:  Those Gilberts behind it are awesome too.:up:


Thanks Austin and Terry. I had to hustle to get that one. I heard about it late Wednesday night, left straight from work Thursday night, drove 4 hours and cut the deal. There's some real dedicated collectors in that area and I knew it wouldn't be there past Friday. Crazy about what we do, I drove the fours hours back, rolled in at 11:30, got up at 5 and went back to work. Worth it I think.

Last edited on Sun Jan 1st, 2012 11:57 pm by Michael Rathberger

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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 01:26 am
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Terry Burns
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Michael,
It was absolutely worth everything you went through , to get this beautiful fan . Driving that far , straight away ....you made your own luck on this one !! Congratulations !!

Last edited on Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 01:48 am by Terry Burns

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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 03:57 am
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Russ Huber
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Did Ja keep it under the speed limit on the way there Mike? :D Perfect size. I couldn't nail your EXACT motor, but I have a book link for you to page through. There are C-W applications throughout the book, so take your time with it. The copyright of the book is 98. Enjoy your toy.

http://books.google.com/books?id=CUIOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA401&dq=Crocker-Wheeler+electric+motor+1898&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false

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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 05:30 am
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Jim Kovar
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Michael, great find, you did well. :clap:

Side by side brushes riding on the same commutator are to increase the total surface contact and thus increase the current carrying capability without excessive brush heating, wear and sparking. Could be done with one wide brush but it is difficult to get even brush pressure over the entire brush width and brushes are more likely to get canted and thus get hung up in their brush holder guides if they are too wide.

I suspect, but not totally sure, your C-W is actually a generator, possibly to charge 6 volt car batteries or for electroplating. If it is a series motor, the 1000 RPM rating would have little meaning. Could possibly be a shunt motor?

By the way, I really dig the deco Gilberts, too. :up:

Last edited on Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 05:55 am by Jim Kovar

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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 11:21 am
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Mike Petree
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 Excellent find !!  Congratulations. Going to toss my hat in with the others... I really like those Gilberts as well.:D

 

 

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 Posted: Mon Jan 2nd, 2012 02:17 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Jim Kovar wrote:
Michael, great find, you did well. :clap:

Side by side brushes riding on the same commutator are to increase the total surface contact and thus increase the current carrying capability without excessive brush heating, wear and sparking. Could be done with one wide brush but it is difficult to get even brush pressure over the entire brush width and brushes are more likely to get canted and thus get hung up in their brush holder guides if they are too wide.

I suspect, but not totally sure, your C-W is actually a generator, possibly to charge 6 volt car batteries or for electroplating. If it is a series motor, the 1000 RPM rating would have little meaning. Could possibly be a shunt motor?

By the way, I really dig the deco Gilberts, too. :up:


Thanks Jim, the brush explanation makes good sense. I'm not certain on motor/generator, but there was a CW sold on Ebay that was much larger but 1000 RPM's as well.

And to all on the Gilberts, yes, those are a couple of my favorites. When they came up for sale from another collector I had to have them. You can't find everything in the wild like the CW, and either way to pick em up is fun, but I love the finds in the wild.

Russ, lets just say I didn't see any speed limit signs....

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 04:47 am
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Chuck Abernathy
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I'm late in this discussion, but I agree with Jim...probably a plating dynamo.

Nice machine, and perfect size!

I have the same machine in 3 volts.

Attached Image (viewed 692 times):

CW 1 6 HP 3 V Motor Lt.JPG

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 04:49 am
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Chuck Abernathy
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Here's the tag.

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CW 1 6 HP 3 v Motor Tag.JPG

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 01:06 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Chuck Abernathy wrote: I'm late in this discussion, but I agree with Jim...probably a plating dynamo.



Could be, there is an odd wire out of one of the coils with a soldered loop which could have been used for the conducting "?" rod into the tank.

Nice "machine" by the way Chuck, you have some great stuff in your collection.

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 01:53 pm
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Chuck Abernathy
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Could be, Michael, but on mine the external leads would be attached to the two wing nut terminals (one nut missing).

Possibly your loose soldered loop should be attached there??

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 02:17 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Chuck Abernathy wrote: Could be, Michael, but on mine the external leads would be attached to the two wing nut terminals (one nut missing).

Possibly your loose soldered loop should be attached there??


I looked at that Chuck, however, nothing seems to have been apart on the motor in a very long time and there's only one connection point it could possibly reach.

Regardless, it's for smarter people than me to figure out. I didn't show that side of the motor, but my configuration has the "poles" with the wingnuts vertically next to the brushes on that side of the motor, there's a bridge from the other side of the frame making the connection to the coils and the outlets. It's a more complex setup than yours, and probably not necessary, yours seems really straightforward.

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 02:54 pm
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Chuck Abernathy
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Wish I could help, Michael, but I place myself in a similar category...others more moxie than I have to tell me which configuration for a motor and which for a dynamo...these can go either way. I can't read your AMPS, but notice mine's 20 AMPS!! See the large wire to the brushes!

I have larger CW motors which are wired with a separate circuit for the fields and for the armature. After starting, if you reduce the voltage to the fields, the motor SPEEDS up...has to do with impedance, etc, but I don't fully understand, and could certainly not calculate it. McComas can tell you, if you are interested.

I bought them because I just love the C-W shape! I also have several sizes of dyna-motors; converters of DC to AC. These have the same shape, but have slip rings on the end away from the brushes. DC runs the motor, and AC is taken off the slip rings.

Attached Image (viewed 393 times):

CW 0.25 HP Converter sw side.JPG

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 Posted: Mon Jan 9th, 2012 05:49 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Chuck Abernathy wrote:  I can't read your AMPS, but notice mine's 20 AMPS!! See the large wire to the brushes!



It's only 4 Amps Chuck, which isn't a heck of a lot. The fact it has the pully either means it was driving something or being driven, which of course goes without saying.

I do have a AC to DC rig with a Century AC motor driving an Emerson DC 14V generator. The Emerson tag dates it to about 1914-1919. I saw the same basic outfit (Century to Emerson) on Ebay a few years back they called a battery charger. As heavy as the CW is, this thing outweighs it by a good 40-50 pounds.

Your CW DC to AC is really cool.

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