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Wheeler's First Fan  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2012 08:46 pm
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Russ Huber
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Has anyone ever seen an image or 1882-83 article talking about Wheeler's first fan? In 1904 all the big boys got together and pinned a metal on his chest for being the dude that invented the electric fan.

Anyone ever see some proof Wheeler actually was marketing and early fan? :wondering:

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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2012 09:42 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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I think it was the CW fan of 1895. Wheeler pretty much, nominated himself, and lobbied for the award.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 04:33 am
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David Hunter
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Russ, you are the research king. I'm sure you won't let us down. ; )

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 04:43 am
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René Rondeau
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Well, we know Wheeler (with Crocker) was making fans at least as early as 1892. But before that, I haven't seen anything.

Then again, I can credit Russ for 80% of the old materials I have in my archives. If anyone can find the answer, it's him.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 05:21 am
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Steve Cunningham
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If I'm not mistaken the first CW fan was 1895-1896. In 1894 CW moved to Ampere, NJ.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 05:49 am
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Steve Stephens
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This is from Sept. 1914

Attached Image (viewed 6420 times):

S. Wheeler, Sept. 1914.jpeg

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 05:50 am
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Steve Stephens
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Second part.

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S. Wheeler, Sept. 1914-2.jpeg

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 05:51 am
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Steve Stephens
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1890

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CW MOTOR FAN 1890.jpg

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 06:11 am
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Jim Kovar
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Steve Stephens wrote:
1890
Thanks, Steve, for jarring my memory.
I knew I've seen that 1890 article before. :wondering:

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 12:45 pm
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Russ Huber
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All the jibbor jabbor I have read states Wheeler conceived the "buzz fan" idea in 82 and by 83 it was being manufactured, and marketed. So.....anyone got a 82 or 83 article, or image of Wheeler's 83 buzz? If so, share it with the world, and me. :up: I'm not saying Wheeler and the boys didn't make it, I just want to see it, or read about it through a book from at least 83.

Wheeler's buzz was stated to be a two wing. Anyone have an image of it? I have seen Griscom's buzz. Belding had fans in his workshop prior to the 90 model shown in a book.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 04:40 pm
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Loren Haroldson
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I'll condense this and it was a while since I did this...Wheeler lobbied in 03-04 to be recognized.. Where this 82 comes from I believe was Skofield's book. I don't remember where I got this but when writing his book he called the Franklin Institute asking them what year Wheeler was credited with inventing the fan. They either couldn't, wouldn't or didn't respond with an answer...so I believe he just took the earliest year he could find for an electric fan which appears to have been Griscom's in 82. In fact he had a woodcut of that fan in his book. I wish I could remember where I read or dug this bit up but I just can't...I do know that he called Franklin I. and didn't get an answer to his question. PS I believe Crocker Curtis unveiled their fan in 87 at the Paris Exposition. A fan with a Crocker Wheeler indication followed by one or maybe two years later though I always suspected Wheeler had something to do with that first C and C fan.

Last edited on Fri Oct 12th, 2012 04:43 pm by Loren Haroldson

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 07:57 pm
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René Rondeau
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Just as a point of clarification: the Paris exposition was held in 1889. (I collect memorabilia from that fair.)

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 Posted: Fri Oct 12th, 2012 08:56 pm
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Jim Kovar
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Steve Cunningham wrote: Wheeler pretty much, nominated himself, and lobbied for the award.

I agree with Steve, of Wheeler's
claim to fame, the "supposed"
invention of the electric fan.


6000 years ago, he would have
claimed invention of the wheel,
thus his name.  :wondering:


“Wiki.answers.com” is lacking
facts and is contradictive and
conflicting in its answers as usual.


http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Who_invented_the_first_electric_fan

[Who invented the first electric fan?

Answer:

Schulyer Wheeler invented the
electric fan in 1886... 

Schuyler Skaats Wheeler,
born
May 17, 1860...
...at the
age of 22 invented
the two bladed electric fan.]

1886...  OK,
But wait, 1860 + 22 = 1882
Wiki, which is it, 1886 or 1882?

Last edited on Fri Oct 12th, 2012 09:06 pm by Jim Kovar

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2012 09:31 am
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Russ Huber
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Loren Haroldson wrote:
I'll condense this and it was a while since I did this...Wheeler lobbied in 03-04 to be recognized.. Where this 82 comes from I believe was Skofield's book. I don't remember where I got this but when writing his book he called the Franklin Institute asking them what year Wheeler was credited with inventing the fan. They either couldn't, wouldn't or didn't respond with an answer...so I believe he just took the earliest year he could find for an electric fan which appears to have been Griscom's in 82. In fact he had a woodcut of that fan in his book. I wish I could remember where I read or dug this bit up but I just can't...I do know that he called Franklin I. and didn't get an answer to his question. PS I believe Crocker Curtis unveiled their fan in 87 at the Paris Exposition. A fan with a Crocker Wheeler indication followed by one or maybe two years later though I always suspected Wheeler had something to do with that first C and C fan.

Wheeler, Curtis, and Crocker share a motor patent filed in 82.

Wheeler like looking at himself in the mirror. Fact....Wheeler made his claim a decade prior to 04. What Wheeler did not anticipate at that time was the fact the Eddie Johnson voiced himself on Wheeler's claim in 94. Eddie was spinning blades on Tommy's bipolars in 82. If that was not enough, Eddie was backed up on his statement.....by letter from Bergmann. They had catalogue material back in 82-83 through Edison to back up fan motors...fact Jack.

Keep in mind people....these are just men....just like... YOU and I. Tesla, it is claimed fired a women in his employee, simply because she was overweight. Pure genius...huh?

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2012 09:35 am
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Russ Huber
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By the way....for those that don't know....Edward Johnson became the CEO of Interior Conduit & Insulation. In his employee was one Robert Lundell.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2012 12:59 pm
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Loren Haroldson
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I dug around and in Wheeler's own handwriting he said about 1886..When soliciting info from other big electrical giants, the Franklin Institute received several letters mentioning Bergmann about 82. Griscom got a mention and so did Wheeler. In Feb of 56 through May, Skofield when writing his book sent several letters to the Franklin citing mentions of 82 and 86 as the invention of the fan. He then received a letter back in May saying they were real busy at the time and had tried to phone him... he then wrote back to the Franklin sayinghe was going to write  it was 86 but maybe 82 and then others like Griscom followed in 83. (he had a woodcut of Griscom's 83 fan) He apparently never got an answer back and proceeded to print the above and hence this is why wwe have sources saying Wheeler did it in 82 but in his own handwriting he said it was 86. wheeler also mentioned he had heard of Bergman's fan but not Griscoms but suspected it was a short run and cheap inefficient fan like Bergmann's.

Of interest, the person he wrote to was a William Wahl at the Franklin. The same William Wahl who was head of the Manufacturer and Builder which had featured Griscom's motor on several occasions.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2012 02:38 pm
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Russ Huber
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Loren Haroldson wrote:
I dug around and in Wheeler's own handwriting he said about 1886..When soliciting info from other big electrical giants, the Franklin Institute received several letters mentioning Bergmann about 82. Griscom got a mention and so did Wheeler. In Feb of 56 through May, Skofield when writing his book sent several letters to the Franklin citing mentions of 82 and 86 as the invention of the fan. He then received a letter back in May saying they were real busy at the time and had tried to phone him... he then wrote back to the Franklin sayinghe was going to write  it was 86 but maybe 82 and then others like Griscom followed in 83. (he had a woodcut of Griscom's 83 fan) He apparently never got an answer back and proceeded to print the above and hence this is why wwe have sources saying Wheeler did it in 82 but in his own handwriting he said it was 86. wheeler also mentioned he had heard of Bergman's fan but not Griscoms but suspected it was a short run and cheap inefficient fan like Bergmann's.

Of interest, the person he wrote to was a William Wahl at the Franklin. The same William Wahl who was head of the Manufacturer and Builder which had featured Griscom's motor on several occasions.


Loren, I recently just came across this 94 article shown. Prior to seeing it, I had no clue Wheeler was making claim to being Mr. Fan as early as 94. I have never seen you mention this in your posts of past. I have only seen Wheeler's recognition of 04.

You mention Bergmann's fan above. If you read this article, Bergmann directed a letter to Edward Johnson supporting Johnson stuck the blade on a motor axle in 82-83....not Bergmann himself. I am also suprised being both Johnson and Bergmann were connected to Edison, Edison did not make claim he invented the fan.

What this article of 94 does support,is the award given to Wheeler in 04, needs to be given back. The article does not necessarily support Johnson as the fan inventor, what it does support is just how FUBAR the recognition of the inventor of the electric fan really is.

Attached Image (viewed 1996 times):

WheelerBS-94-2.png

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2012 03:23 pm
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Loren Haroldson
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I wasn't aware of Wheeler's claim in 94.  When he first wrote in 02 to the Franklin to be recognized, he said it was at the urging of T C  Martin... Later Martin's testimony is one of the stronger ones in his support.. 

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2012 03:25 pm
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Russ Huber
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BTW, after reading about Johnson's claim to plopping a blade on a motor axle in 82 in the post above....I don't think Griscom's death would of had any bearing on his defending the "Mr. Fan" title. You would of had to put Wheeler, Johnson,and Griscom in a room and let them duke it out for the title. 9 chances out of 10, some unknown had a blade on a battery motor well before them.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2012 03:32 pm
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Russ Huber
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Loren Haroldson wrote:
I wasn't aware of Wheeler's claim in 94.  When he first wrote in 02 to the Franklin to be recognized, he said it was at the urging of T C  Martin... Later Martin's testimony is one of the stronger ones in his support.. 

Well, it is now clear Wheeler was pushing getting his name in lights for a full decade, and finally won. Wheeler liked what he saw in the mirror. Just to think the arrogant butt head has his name plastered all over the web and history books as Mr. fan.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 05:10 am
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Russ Huber
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Here it is, Loren. To bad so sad, not even a preview. A Bergmann & Company catalogue for 83. You can bet your life there is an Edison bipolar in there with a blade thanks to Eddie. :D

For those that don't know Bergmann and Johnson were partners in crime I believe starting in 81. Edison jumped in with em I think in 82?

http://books.google.com/books?id=T7nutgAACAAJ&dq=Bergmann+and+company&source=bl&ots=zZBH8FzYiu&sig=_Xh_VVQ4hE7dHE_CXMw5Cg4M3jc&hl=en

Pssssssst...notice the mention of APPLIANCES in the catalogue. Oooooh ya.

Illustrated Catalogue and Price List Electroliers, Brackets, Newells, Etc. and Appliances Adapted to the Use of the Edison Incandescent Electric Light~ Bergmann & Co. 1883

Bummer that Eddie didn't get the "Mr. Fan" award for 82. Eddie would of had a double wammy....The electric fan...aaannd...Xmas tree lights. Fact Jack...Eddie Johnson is credited for electric christmas tree lighting for 82. Do you think there was someone before Eddie? :wondering: Think about it.:D

Last edited on Tue Oct 16th, 2012 05:58 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 06:14 am
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Russ Huber
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I remember reading EARLY interest in the need for ventilation. I bet Johnson was in second heaven when the innovative Lundell went on his payroll..fact Jack.:D

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 08:29 am
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Steve Cunningham
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My best guess is Electro-Dynamic and/or Iceberg predated Wheeler's deeds. But remember, the Europeans were three to five years ahead of us in electrical progress. I saw a piece years ago about an electrical exhibit in Europe, ca 1875-1880. The Europeans were displaying some big dynamos. So, if Russ and Loren keep plugging away, we may find more. Here's a hint. Until about 1875, Electrical World Magazine (or Electrical Review) was published as "Factory Magazine". I assume when the electrical phenomena struck, wise men decided to latch on with their magazine. I bet if you could research prior World Fairs you might find some goodies. I think it was at the 1893 Columbian Exposition, that Emerson had a display, set up inside a Kansas Prairie School. There were Emerson Tripods on a table inside a mockup of a classroom. For whatever reason Emerson was set up in a neighboring state's exhibit, we may never know. The St. Louis World's Fair had a big Electrical Display. I imagine you'd see Century, Wagner, Emerson, Peerless, all set up there. I think the St. Louis Public Library has a large World Fair Collection.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:20 pm
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Stefan Osdene
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Union Electro Motor company of New York advertised an electric fan as early as 1876, a full five years earlier than Electro Dynamic Or Iceberg. Here is a 1876 flyer from Union. Note the mention of "fans" near the top of the page.

Attached Image (viewed 1973 times):

Union Electric Motor Flyer 1876 A.jpg

Last edited on Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:20 pm by Stefan Osdene

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:21 pm
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Stefan Osdene
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Note the testimonial on the left hand side of the page for the use of their fan in 1876! This certainly predates anything I have seen in Europe or America for that matter.

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Union Electric Motor Flyer 1876 B.jpg

Last edited on Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:22 pm by Stefan Osdene

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:23 pm
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Stefan Osdene
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Third Image.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:24 pm
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Stefan Osdene
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Larger Union Motor Owned By Vavras and displayed at Fan Fair. Although this is not likely a fan motor, it is probably of the same construction as the earliest Union fan motor.

Attached Image (viewed 1870 times):

Union Electro Motor 1.JPG

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:24 pm
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Stefan Osdene
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Second Image.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 01:25 pm
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Stefan Osdene
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Union Patent.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2012 03:26 pm
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Russ Huber
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Batteries to run primative motors must of improved significantly since Davenport of the 1830s.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 05:42 am
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David Hunter
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Recently, I read another assertion that Edison invented the light bulb in 1879 and so I started to think about fans. It seems that history is messy but people like to tidy things up into a nice neat story. The above literature hints at electric fans 3 years before the invention of the light bulb in 1879. Still, if Schuyler Wheeler invented the electric fan in 1882, where is the literature, illustrations, or proof? What about the first fan in 1886? Does anyone own this fan or is there any proof of its production? I thought I would find some answers in this thread but so far it has been inconclusive.

Last edited on Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 05:42 am by David Hunter

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 Posted: Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 06:00 am
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Steve Cunningham
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History has been kind to Edison. He didn't invent the light bulb. He is credited with inventing the first practical light bulb. Wheeler lobbied to be named the inventor of the electric fan. 

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 Posted: Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 04:11 pm
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Russ Huber
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David Hunter wrote: Recently, I read another assertion that Edison invented the light bulb in 1879 and so I started to think about fans. It seems that history is messy but people like to tidy things up into a nice neat story. The above literature hints at electric fans 3 years before the invention of the light bulb in 1879. Still, if Schuyler Wheeler invented the electric fan in 1882, where is the literature, illustrations, or proof? What about the first fan in 1886? Does anyone own this fan or is there any proof of its production? I thought I would find some answers in this thread but so far it has been inconclusive.

Wheeler was whining he wanted to be Mr. Fan as early as 94.  Bergmann and Edward Johnson(Interior Conduit Lundell fan motors) commented in 94 about Wheeler's claim to fame.  Bergmann went on to say he supported Johnson stuck a blade on an electric motor earlier than Wheeler's claim if memory serves me right? Notice I said BERGMANN supported Johnson...not BERGMANN supported BERGMANN.  


If you ever got a good look at Wheeler, in my book he has arrogance written all over his face.  Dudes like Chuck Eck had to pave his path and feed his rug rats.  Eck was more concerned with staying on top of the game to keep his business growing and establish himself as a quality fan manufacturer.  Loren shared a picture of Eck's early factory either on Wooster in NY,  or when he FIRST moved to New Jersey for the 97 fan motor season, you could see Eck in the BACKGROUND.  Wheeler has his smug mug pictured all over in history books.

Fan motor popularity did not gain momentum until the early 90s.  Once the ball started rolling for marketing fan motors, you start seeing them advertised in the early 90 electrical books.  In the 80s fan motor popularity had not gained enough momentum.  There were but a few being marketed.  So.... just tidbits of fan motor advertisements.   I am sure you would of had to be J.P. Morgan to take home a C&C finger chopper in the 80s, let alone the 90s.   

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 Posted: Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 04:28 pm
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Russ Huber
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As a side note.....When I refer to Bergmann and Edward Johnson and a fan motor, this is back in the early 80s with their connection to the Edison lighting system.  I believe there is an early Edison catalogue material that sported a fan motor.  I think I read that right in the past?

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 Posted: Tue Oct 22nd, 2013 06:26 pm
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Loren Haroldson
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In regards to Edison's boys and a fan blade. Among the testimony during Wheeler's attempt to gain recognition, there was reference made that maybe it was Edison as someone wrote that a blade was attached to a motor to speed up the carbonizing of the bamboo in the making of a ligh filament.. By Edison, it could have meant someone associated with Edison like Johnson and or Bergmann perhaps? but that wouldn't have been a device designed specifically as a desk fan.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 23rd, 2013 04:13 am
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Russ Huber
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The article can be found entitled "The Electric Fan Motor" On page 46 after clicking on the link below.  You will have to enlarge the page with the magnifying feature to read the article more than likely.


Edward Johnson is challenging Wheeler openly to his I am Mr. Fan Claim.  Bergmann in a letter supported Johnson. Bergmann and Johnson were in business partnership starting in 81. 


Notice that Wheeler only made claim of the mention of the fan blade on motor connecting it to C&C in 86.  Wheeler expressed no prior date to having placed a fan blade on a motor.


http://books.google.com/books?id=ocU0AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA46&dq=Dr.+Schuyler+S.+Wheeler+recently+laid+claim+in+the+columns+++1894&hl=en&sa=X&ei=zjpnUrTHFcer2gWT6ICwAg&ved=0CEgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Dr.%20Schuyler%20S.%20Wheeler%20recently%20laid%20claim%20in%20the%20columns%20%20%201894&f=false

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 Posted: Thu Oct 24th, 2013 06:29 am
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Russ Huber
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Find a Bergmann & Company Catalogue dating mid 82-83 and you will more than likely find a small Edison fan motor.  Based on Edward Johnson's own admission he regrets not realizing the importance at that time of a patent on a fan motor.  So this should give some insight was to why the 80s fan motors were so far a few between in the books.  The facts are the motor manufacturers had them in use on their work benches.  Belding would have been one of those. 

http://books.google.com/books?id=8U-Naf4DuzMC&pg=PA169&dq=Bergmann+and+Company&hl=en&sa=X&ei=cKxoUs_QKMXY2AWY_4GoCg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Bergmann%20and%20Company&f=false

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