AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Missing Link Found in Saint Louis

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Rod Rogers, Larry Hancock Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  ...  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Printer Friendly
Missing Link Found in Saint Louis  Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:11 pm
   
81st Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline

Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:52 pm by Mark Behrend

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:11 pm
   
82nd Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And

Attached Image (viewed 900 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top  

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:12 pm
   
83rd Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And

Attached Image (viewed 926 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:12 pm
   
84th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And

Attached Image (viewed 894 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top  

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:13 pm
   
85th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And

Attached Image (viewed 904 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:13 pm
   
86th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And

Attached Image (viewed 884 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top  

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:14 pm
   
87th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And

Attached Image (viewed 897 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:15 pm
   
88th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
And the next two are dedicated to Kim Franks

Attached Image (viewed 868 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top  

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:16 pm
   
89th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
G.E Blades if you didn't know

Attached Image (viewed 874 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:30 pm
   
90th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: The basic thing I did NOT make clear is the 1894 model Mestons are not brush and commutator and DO have the large hanging switch.  "Yes Russ, from the original Emerson catalogs.  Noticed you used the spelling Emerson did then; "catalogue". ~ Bill Hoehn

Hi Bill, we have a 95 Electrical World stating the Emerson induction desk fan motor was introduced to the market in 95. You on the other hand are stating you have catalogue material showing this induction fan motor on the market in 94? 
 
Could you please share a catalogue picture with the induction fan motor with rear lever with 94 dating please? I would be interested in the month shown with this fan if it exists.  Thank you!

Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2014 11:12 pm by Russ Huber

Back To Top  

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:53 pm
   
91st Post
Steve Stephens
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: Detailed pictures of the 1894 Mestons with the large, original hanging switches (non brush and commutator) will be included!!!I want to thank you Bill and Mark for all the photos you posted.  Sometimes the photos are needed to make a point or determine some information.  

Larry Reifsteck sent me the following few sentences  today which I had also included on my own in my previous LONG post (15th post) on the first page of this thread but I will repost here in case you missed it before:

This is as simple as it gets

In the 1896 Emerson catalog on page 18 

SPECIAL DIRECTIONS FOR FAN MOTORS
Our Meston motors have speed regulators for any desired speed. for Full speed, The place regulator thumb screw at mark on slot in front cover ; reduce speed by moving towards center

Our Emerson induction motors place regulating lever so that contacted is made  on two studs in back cover. to cut out current entirely, throw lever to contact with the black stud-- or preferably throw regulator switch.


They are clearly differentiating between the Meston motors and the Induction motors and state indirectly that the Meston has variable speeds and a switch lever on the front cover while their Induction motor has a switch lever on the back of the motor.  This is in 1896 when both the Meston and Induction motors had been on the market for a year.

The Emerson Induction motor does have "MESTON AC MOTOR" cast in the bronze front plate and I can't explain why a motor that is not a Meston would have that.  A carryover casting perhaps that Emerson had not seen a need to change or a reuse of the old Meston pattern?  I would say that what is written in the original Emerson catalogs as to what the front switch and the back switch models were called by Emerson takes precedence over what might have been cast on the motor housing.

Again, to recap my findings;

"Meston" fan motors are brush and commutator motors with infinitely variable speeds and all have a lever on the top front of the motor to adjust the speeds.  If an Emerson fan motor has a back switch it is not a Meston and Emersons' catalogs clearly show that.

"Emerson Induction" fan motors do not have brushes or commutator and all do have a back switch with distinct switch contacts to run at the start or high or low positions.  These are not considered to be Meston motors by Emerson since Emerson states that their Meston motors are brush and commutator motors.

Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2014 10:57 pm by Steve Stephens

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 11:28 pm
   
92nd Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Russ,
I do not share my over 58 original Emerson catalogs anymore, except to trusted friends, because of many bad experiences with museums and individuals. I also do not plan on having anyone post pictures again or sending my fans to Fan-Fair since I have found out that even with pictures and having the fans in their hands(with damage), some people do not accept reality.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 11:42 pm
   
93rd Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Mark Behrend wrote: OK, here we go, lots and lots of pics
This is the 1893 Meston with the '93 patent and top switch & I.V.S.

Back To Top    

 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 11:56 pm
   
94th Post
Mark Behrend
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Oct 21st, 2010
Location: Wildwood, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: Mark Behrend wrote: OK, here we go, lots and lots of pics
This is the 1893 Meston with the '93 patent and top switch & I.V.S.

Attached Image (viewed 879 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 12:12 am
   
95th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: Russ,
I do not share my over 58 original Emerson catalogs anymore, except to trusted friends, because of many bad experiences with museums and individuals. I also do not plan on having anyone post pictures again or sending my fans to Fan-Fair since I have found out that even with pictures and having the fans in their hands(with damage), some people do not accept reality.

Bill, that is a shame. The 95 Electrical World is very clear a new Emerson induction desk fan motor was placed on the market in 95. As stated in my previous post I found nothing to support an Emerson induction desk fan motor being introduced on the market in 94 through a number of the legit electrical books covering the 94 fan motor season.(Western Electrician, Electricity, Electrical age, and Electrical World.)  In my world, seeing is believing. Emerson may of had the induction fan motor in the 94 catalogue in preparation for introduction for the 95 fan motor season? 

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 12:25 am
   
96th Post
Gary Hagan
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Jan 15th, 2013
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Im excited for the guy that snagged a meston. Could be the last one in the wild. I am dying to see it. Congrats on your find.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 12:29 am
   
97th Post
Jeff Whitfield
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri Apr 9th, 2010
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Nice pictures and good information.
Thanks for posting this!

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 12:40 am
   
98th Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
You're welcome Jeff, it was fun. Glad I now had time to open the 1894 Meston for people that recognize and appreciate the fact that the Emerson Electric Co. did not misname their products and call a Meston an Emerson!!!

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:09 am
   
99th Post
Kim Frank
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Nov 15th, 2005
Location: Whitestown, Indiana USA
Status: 
Offline
Dr. Emerson Bill, thanks for sharing. I will be the first to admit that I have absolutely no idea what was being discussed here on this thread. I know enough about Emersons to be dangerous, and even less about Mestons. The Gemerson is still the only Emerson that I would consider a truly fine fan, but I'd have to be blind to not notice that the other fans pictured run a close second or third......

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:16 am
   
100th Post
Steve Stephens
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill, this blade and hub are interesting.  It is the one you got on the new 'missing link' I think that started this thread.  4 wings came to tripods for 1900 didn't they and replaced the 5 wings used on the 1898-99 models?  But the Patent Appl'd For marked wing is seen on at least some (mine) 1898 tripod models.  The patent was applied for Sept. 9, 1898 so it would be improbably that a Patent Appl'd For wing would adorn a blade before that date.  

http://www.google.com/patents/US632740?dq=632740&hl=en&sa=X&ei=blS3U6qCCM_woAT2joDgCg&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAA

The rounded front of the hub looks a bit more domed than usual but now I see how the motor shaft may poke through the front of it. Posts 58-68 I think are of your new "Meston", is that correct?

Attached Image (viewed 834 times):

image-1.jpg

Last edited on Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:30 am by Steve Stephens

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:17 am
   
101st Post
Steve Stephens
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: Glad I now had time to open the 1894 Meston for people that recognize and appreciate the fact that the Emerson Electric Co. did not misname their products and call a Meston an Emerson!!!Bill you were very nice to do that; spend the time to show us the inside of your 1895 (or 1894 as you said) motor.  I assume the photo below is the motor you are referring to.

From the 1896 Emerson catalog Page 7:  
"Emerson Electric" Alternating Induction Fan Motor.   Three speeds, Without Commutator or Brushes.    New and Without a Rival.  Its General Appearance is like our Celebrated "Meston" Motor.  The fan, as illustrated, has the rear hanging switch.

What you show below is their Induction Motor with no brushes or commutator.  The Meston motors have brushes and commutator so that can't be a Meston and, yes, I know the front motor plate is marked MESTON.   The Emerson 1896 and 1898 catalogs differentiate between the Meston and Induction motors.  They do not say to read the front of the motor to tell what motor it is.  The other features (brushes, commutator or the lack thereof and the switch type) are what make a Meston or an Emerson Induction motor.

Attached Image (viewed 836 times):

image.jpg

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:26 am
   
102nd Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Kim,What took you so long?  I was expecting a quick reply and appreciation for your first exposure to those two views of that ge blade and the previous picture of that beautiful Emerson with the unique ge switch.
Thanks also for the positive feedback.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:29 am
   
103rd Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
No reference to 1894 in this post.  1895 +
 
http://www.afcaforum.com/forum1/20146.html

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:39 am
   
104th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
1896 catalogue image. New would indicate now, or recent.
 

 
The Electrical World, Volume 25. June 22, 1895.

 
This is a direct quote from the June 22, 1895 Emerson Electrical World article:

 
"Two "NEW" motors have been "brought out" by the Emerson Company- a ceiling fan for alternating current circuits, and an induction desk fan motor which has neither commutator or collector rings.


Attached Image (viewed 853 times):

1896 Emerson Fa Catalog Page 7.jpg

Last edited on Sat Jul 5th, 2014 02:52 am by Russ Huber

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 01:55 am
   
105th Post
Steve Stephens
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Status: 
Offline
"It's General Appearance is like our Celebrated "Meston" Motor".

No mention of this fan BEING a Meston Motor and nowhere in Emerson Catalogs will you see in the descriptions the name Meston in reference to their back switch "Emerson Induction" Motor.

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 03:18 am
   
106th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill, as you may of noticed I sponge a wide spectrum of fan history.  With all due respects to you, I could care less what kind, or how many fans you have, or fan catalogues. I have seen many a fan my fan friend.
 
I try my best to be accurate with getting the facts right with fan history here. I then post it for the AFCA members and archives. Taking some ones word for a date like Gospel is not like viewing the actual image or document, not my style. I have no interest in your 58 Emerson catalogues.  I only have interest in one page in your 94 catalogue to validate your claim the Emerson induction motor was on the market in 94 as you claim.
 
I am known on this website for my integrity.  If you would be so kind as to send me an image(email by my avatar) of this one catalogue page to validate your claim your Emerson induction motor is a 94, I promise you it will not leave this computer. Let me know please. Thank you.
 

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 03:36 am
   
107th Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Russ,
As far as defining "new" for the 1896 cut of the Meston, it is also in the 1895 catalog as mentioned several times.
  Even though Emerson's first catalog of 79 pages was dated 1892 (and they had regular supplements) the Meston brothers were certainly making fans and guards in 1890 before they incorporated in the fall---as you noted.  A company does not normally incorporate and then start producing, but the opposite.  They also state "The unparalleled sale of these motors during the season of 1891 is perhaps the best proof of their merits." 
'Emerson Electric Co. A Century of Manufacturing 1890-1990' clearly states "The entrepreneurs behind Emerson---two resourceful Scottish orphans, Alexander and Charles Meston---met the first challenge by developing a stream of electrical and mechanical devices such as motors, switches, and fan guards in the late 1880s and early 1890s."
I know you like having your information and resources correct.

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 03:55 am
   
108th Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Russ,
 
Just found your last post and am thrilled to see that you could "care less" about my fans and catalogs.
 
I guess I am wrong in assuming that's what the AFCA is all about.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 04:11 am
   
109th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill,  as stated, I am a member known by others here of integrity.  You have made it clear you don't want your catalogue spread around.  No problem, it stays with me.  I am seeking but one 94 Emerson catalogue page with dating validating your claim. That claim being the Emerson induction motor with back lever was on the market in 94. I then can validate your claim based on legit ephemera. How easy is that?

 
If your 94 Emerson ephemera in fact is accurate it will disprove the article written by the Electrical World of 94. If you chose to prove your claim....fine.  If you refuse to send the catalogue picture to validate your claim.... then there is nothing to validate your claim.  

Last edited on Sat Jul 5th, 2014 04:15 am by Russ Huber

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 04:14 am
   
110th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: Russ,
 
Just found your last post and am thrilled to see that you could "care less" about my fans and catalogs.
 
I guess I am wrong in assuming that's what the AFCA is all about.

What I am suggesting is that is your business what you have, not mine. Sorry if you misinterpreted my message.  I am only asking you to email the 94 catalogue page as you do not want to post it and have it spread.

Last edited on Sat Jul 5th, 2014 04:36 am by Russ Huber

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 03:36 pm
   
111th Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Steve,
 
Posts 55 to 66 are my new fan with the Meston adapter ring used to fit the Emerson tripod cages to the Mestons, and the carrying handle made from an old clothes hanger.

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 05:47 pm
   
112th Post
Steve Stephens
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill, what are your thoughts about the age of your new tripod?

A back switch bronze belled motor seems too late to have a blade on it with a Patent Appl'd For (pat. applied for on Sept. 9, 1898).   I suppose that the blade could have been a replacement but it's not a blade we have seen on any other Emerson I don't think.

Also, after bearing with me, I hope, through my posts about the Emerson "Meston" being only those motors with brush and commutator, have your thoughts on what is a Meston changed along with mine?  If not, can you tell me why?

I understand about the MESTON AC MOTOR cast into the back switch bronze end bell motors but the Emerson catalogs do state that Meston Motors are brush and commutator motors.  The bronze Meston castings may have resulted from the reuse/modification of the original Meston end bell pattern.  Nothing is written in Emerson literature about this aspect of the bronze back switch motors but plenty is said and shown in the catalogs about Meston motors being brush and commutator.  I hope you have read at least the 1896 and 1898 catalogs as thoroughly as I have and have seen the references to Mesto and Emerson Induction motors and can think this all through to reach a valid conclusion.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 10:56 pm
   
113th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
.

Attached Image (viewed 773 times):

books.png

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sat Jul 5th, 2014 11:42 pm
   
114th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Bill Hoehn wrote: My 1894 catalog is mismarked and the 1895 catalogs show both the 1893 Type M.1. Meston and the 1894 Type E.I.1. 
 
 

Bill, how is this catalogue that has the claimed 94 Emerson induction desk fan motor is mismarked? Sorry for the hassle, I am rather a tenacious kinda guy.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 05:53 am
   
115th Post
Steve Stephens
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: San Anselmo, California USA
Status: 
Offline
Who can you believe?  Looking at another thread-http://www.afcaforum.com/forum1/15832.html
 about the Meston motor and the page, below, was linked to.  An 1898 Electrical Age publication and they are showing the 1898 tripod named as a Meston fan motor.  That's just not true.

http://books.google.com/books?id=VNdDAAAAYAAJ&dq=Emerson%20Electric%20fan%20motor&pg=PA202#v=onepage&q=Emerson%20Electric%20fan%20motor&f=false

Near the top of p. 204 in the from the link above it says " For the accommodation of such patrons as used their 1897 type of motor and prefer that type they will also manufacture their last year's type of motor and are prepared to furnish either style promptly on short notice"

The 1898 Emerson catalog does list the 1897 model Emerson Induction fan motor along with the 'old reliable Meston" and the new "1898 Model Alternating Fan Motor".

The 1898 model is shown with a 5 wing pizza blade fan.  I have never seen this type of Emerson tripod with anything other than a 5 or 4 wing Parker blade.  Has anyone seen one with an original 5 wing pizza blade?  I know that Ron Jeter had a pizza blade fan made up.

Last edited on Sun Jul 6th, 2014 06:05 am by Steve Stephens

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 10:11 am
   
116th Post
Bill Hoehn
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri May 13th, 2011
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
'Morning Steve,
Looks and feels like a good morning to stir up some more ----!.

Where to start? There are so many errors in your first thread! I won't even bother to correct them.

Please find the Sept. 18, '94 Emerson patent (I don't know how---and will admit it). I assume it is the induction motor replacing the brush and commutator motor replaced in 1894.

I will ramble on. Every tripod that I have seen with later hole-drilled feet is assumed to be for securing them with screws, which was common practice then.

As to the EI, FI, etc. confusion I have Emersons CONFIDENTIAL TECHNICAL DATA catalog NO. 87 (which was loaned to employees for $50.00 and had to be returned). This is where all of our known Index to Type literature came from. Bulletin 1462 lists FIs through FI9 and EIs through EI6 and the use of each, but since "I'm a man of integrity", I can't reveal more!

On No.1994 they discuss the use of the new General Electric Company hanger for wall fans and it's use for Emerson fans.

On No. 1388 dated July 1, 1912 they discuss "Meston" Fan Motors. It reads: This company is no longer prepared to supply spare parts or make repairs to "Meston" desk fans, types M-1 and M-2. None of the above types have been made during the past fifteen years,(Bill's comment---since 1896?)and all such fans have, accordingly, given all of the service which could reasonably be expected from the apparatus and must be in such condition that any repairs would only be temporary relief. (They had no idea of the future AFCA and it's ingenious members!) In other words, such motors have outlived their usefulness, and from this time on the cost of repairing will not be warranted by the service which may b expected from the motors. All parts and patterns for these old types have been discarded, and customer should be advised in every case that he will obtain more satisfactory results by procuring new apparatus of later design than by attempting to procure further service from the old types, M-1 and M-2.

I'm beginning to feel as verbose as you Steve, but there is a lot more.

As far as I remember no one has ever discussed another Emerson tripod listed and pictured in Catalogue No. 2110. on pages 24 & 25.It is the EMERSON RESIDENCE FAN MOTORS. TYPE E.I. 21. The details are all there and include "This motor operates at one-half the speed of the regular Desk Fan, and is extremely noiseless in operation. It does not throw as strong a blast of air as the regular motor, but gives sufficient breeze for use in residences, and is the only Alternating Fan Motor that can be comfortably used in the sick room."

Wrapping this up for now I'll just mention one other thing Steve. In the 1896 catalog, which you use for details, note that every fan is a Meston, the "Old Reliable" and the "Emerson Electric" (Mfg. Co.---assumed known by everyone) Alternating Induction Fan Motor. With out exception they have the Meston end bells in bronze and the small three hole arrangement for the guard attachment---Unlike the Emersons to follow. Of course the end bells are obviously different for the top switch Meston and the hanging switch Meston.

I'll wait anxiously for your response. Incidentally, just about all of the Mestons referred to in your "threads" were mine at some point in the past.

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 10:50 am
   
117th Post
George Durbin
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2012
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Hi everyone!
The old Mestons are very cool! Lottsa cast iron, copper and bronze... do keep posting pictures of these fans and history as we know it. The shops of the day could change their process or fans on the fly! So nothing surprises me when it comes to early fans. Quality control then was minimal as compared to today. A fan run production in a given year probably went through several changes within its run... JMHO



Geo...

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 12:36 pm
   
118th Post
John Trier
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri Feb 10th, 2006
Location: Adel, Iowa USA
Status: 
Offline
What a fascinating thread, it's one of the first threads I've read from start to finish about 4 times.  Bill... your knowledge and experience with Emerson's and the history that surrounds them is priceless.    Along with the other historians Russ and Steve we get a picture that becomes more and more clear.   My grandfather was 20 years old in 1895, all he had to do was walk over and poke around and take a few notes.  

Bill Fanum was over once working (without success) in getting my '93 Meston running right and not sounding like a gravel truck.   I snapped a picture when he had it open.  This would be the "old reliable"............   

I hope the "real" contributors to this thread will continue their thoughts and experiences.

Attached Image (viewed 740 times):

Meston 6 poles.jpg

Last edited on Sun Jul 6th, 2014 12:42 pm by John Trier

Back To Top  

 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 01:10 pm
   
119th Post
Jeff Whitfield
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri Apr 9th, 2010
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
This is cool.
Are the leads from the poles soldered to some kind of metal plate (commutator?) that comes into contact with the rotor on the opposite side of the plate?
I'm comparing this brush/commutator model to Dr. Bill's induction motor in posts 63 and 64 where it appears the leads go to their respective contact points for use with the lever. Does the motor in posts 63 and 64 go parallel when changing speeds?How about your model, John?
Just curious.



John Trier wrote: What a fascinating thread, it's one of the first threads I've read from start to finish about 4 times.  Bill... your knowledge and experience with Emerson's and the history that surrounds them is priceless.    Along with the other historians Russ and Steve we get a picture that becomes more and more clear.   My grandfather was 20 years old in 1895, all he had to do was walk over and poke around and take a few notes.  

Bill Fanum was over once working (without success) in getting my '93 Meston running right and not sounding like a gravel truck.   I snapped a picture when he had it open.  This would be the "old reliable"............   

I hope the "real" contributors to this thread will continue their thoughts and experiences.

Back To Top    

 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 02:06 pm
   
120th Post
John Trier
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri Feb 10th, 2006
Location: Adel, Iowa USA
Status: 
Offline
Jeff Whitfield wrote: This is cool.
Are the leads from the poles soldered to some kind of metal plate (commutator?) that comes into contact with the rotor on the opposite side of the plate?
I'm comparing this brush/commutator model to Dr. Bill's induction motor in posts 63 and 64 where it appears the leads go to their respective contact points for use with the lever. Does the motor in posts 63 and 64 go parallel when changing speeds?How about your model, John?
Just curious.



John Trier wrote: What a fascinating thread, it's one of the first threads I've read from start to finish about 4 times.  Bill... your knowledge and experience with Emerson's and the history that surrounds them is priceless.    Along with the other historians Russ and Steve we get a picture that becomes more and more clear.   My grandfather was 20 years old in 1895, all he had to do was walk over and poke around and take a few notes.  

Bill Fanum was over once working (without success) in getting my '93 Meston running right and not sounding like a gravel truck.   I snapped a picture when he had it open.  This would be the "old reliable"............   

I hope the "real" contributors to this thread will continue their thoughts and experiences.



In a moment of despair and confusion, I no longer have this Meston.    Kicking myself up one side and down the other. 

Back To Top  

Current time is 03:46 pm Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  ...  Next Page Last Page    
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Missing Link Found in Saint Louis Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.3705 seconds (41% database + 59% PHP). 40 queries executed.