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Help me connect Bridge Rectifier to my Jandus fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2019 11:06 pm
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Cam Kuruliak
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I need help wiring my switch to the bridge rectifier Prior to this I took the fan apart cleaned all the brushes , cleaned the rotor and fixed a loose lead wire I then tested the fan by directly wiring the fan to the rectifier without using the switch and it worked Further checked it using a voltage meter and had 122 V from the plug to the rectifier and 112 V from the fan to the rectifier so I know I have power to the fan  When I tried wiring the switch to the rectifier using the diagram below it will not work so I am doing something wrong but | cannot figure it out Does anybody have a simple diagram I can use or can somebody explain it to me how to hook this up I am limited in my electrical capabilities so try the KISS approach to me please Any help appreciated 
PS:the speed coil is done right as Paul Graves did it

Thx

Cam


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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 01:38 am
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Mark Olson
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Based on your description (and diagram) the switch must be open.


P.S. Double check that you did not mix up the ac and dc sides of the rectifier.

Last edited on Thu Nov 14th, 2019 01:42 am by Mark Olson

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 01:44 am
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Russ Huber
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Cam Kuruliak wrote: PS:the speed coil is done right as Paul Graves did it


Do you have a switch with a SPEED COIL(AC model), or do you have a switch with a Nichrome(resistance wire) wind?

Last edited on Thu Nov 14th, 2019 01:45 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 03:39 am
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Cam Kuruliak
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Mark
I know the wires are connected right The wires from the fan go on the outside prongs of the rectifier ( + & - ) and the wires from the plug go  to the other two (AC)

Russ
 I do not know how Paul wired the speed coil so I attached a picture of it I do know that he was kind enough to mark where the wires from the fan go onto the speed coil ( marked "MOTOR" on diagram)


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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 11:03 pm
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Russ Huber
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Cam Kuruliak wrote:  I tested the fan by directly wiring the fan to the rectifier without using the switch and it worked.



Whatever your doing it appears the problem is at the switch.  If your still having problems, try to locate an electric motor shop near you and simply ask them to please help you. They may just take the time to help without charging you.  Just take the fan in with the switch out and they can use jumpers to get it running and show you how to hook it up. If something is wrong with the switch they may find the problem and advise you. It's worth a shot.  

Attached Image (viewed 169 times):

Full-wave-rectifier-connection-diagram.jpg

Last edited on Thu Nov 14th, 2019 11:03 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 11:40 pm
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Jim Kovar
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Somebody,...  please elaborate.






Last edited on Thu Nov 14th, 2019 11:41 pm by Jim Kovar

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 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2019 11:33 am
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Cam Kuruliak
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Russ
I agree with you the problem is at the switch  Where the cord runs into the fan it is easy to attach them Same with the wires coming from the motor The problem is when I run wire from there the plug & motor wires are attached to the bridge rectifier I blow the breaker I use wires with alligators clips when testing this so I know no wires are not  touching each other DO I NEED A GROUND WIRE SOMEWHERE?
I talked to John MConas and he says I have a Nichrome  wind I do not know if that makes a difference

Cam

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 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2019 02:29 pm
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David Hoatson
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The nichrome speed coil is only used for the slower speeds. Focus on getting high to work. 
For what you are doing, you need a multimeter. 

Connecting a bridge rectifier can be confusing, as sometimes not all 4 terminals are labeled. You may have to get a spec sheet for that specific part. Connecting it wrong can certainly pop breakers and damage a rectifier.

A bridge rectifier contains four diodes arranged like this:




The diodes only let current flow in one direction, indicated by their arrow symbol. Because of this diamond-shaped configuration, many bridge rectifiers have the two AC terminals on opposite corners and the two DC terminals on opposite corners. This can be confusing if the part only has one AC terminal marked and only one DC terminal marked, as is common on block-shaped parts like this:





The flat parts are usually better marked, with the AC terminals in the middle:





So, make sure the bridge rectifier is wired correctly. And, if you pop a breaker, assume you also blew our the bridge rectifier. 

Disconnect the rectifier from the fan. Connect the wall cord to the two AC terminals on the rectifier. If you measure AC volts at the AC terminals, you should read about 120 volts. Now, set the meter to DC volts and read the DC terminals (marked + and -). You should read something like 150 volts. 

With the meter set to ohms, measure each motor winding. You should read something in the range of 20-200 ohms, I think. With a commutator motor, check the armature (spinning part) by removing the brushes and reading the ohms across each pair of opposite commutator contacts, rotating the armature one contact for each reading. You are simulating what the brushes connect to. This checks all the armature windings. 

Measure across each brush/commutator connection to see how well the brush is contacting the commutator. You should read less than 2 ohms. 

Measure ohms across the switch contacts with the switch set to high, then medium, then low. Each measurement should be less than 1 ohm. 

Measure ohms between the high and medium switch contacts. This measures part of the speed coil. Then, measure between the medium and low switch contacts. This measures the other half of the speed coil. Typically, speed coils read between 2 ohms and 50 ohms. 

With the motor fully assembled, including brushes installed, switch set to high, but with the rectifier not connected to the fan yet, measure the ohms across the two power-in terminals. This checks to make sure the motor has no shorts.  You should see a reading probably in the hundred of ohms.

Then, connect the rectifier DC outputs to the fan inputs and see if it runs. 

Last edited on Fri Nov 15th, 2019 02:34 pm by David Hoatson

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 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2019 02:48 pm
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Russ Huber
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Cam Kuruliak wrote:  I am limited in my electrical capabilities.



Cam, if any of the information offered to you gets you to your goal, great. If you still remain with lack of understanding, please seek some help in your area with such as an electric motor shop. If your popping a breaker your shorting out somewhere on the switch or your connections. Good luck.

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 Posted: Fri Nov 15th, 2019 07:21 pm
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Cam Kuruliak
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Thanks Russ & Dave for your help I do know I have no shorts from the wires leading out of the motor I had one fixed it then checked to see if I had power to the motor and I did. I think that I do not have leads from the fan connected to the right terminals on the switch I have. a friend that is a retired electrical engineer but his specialty is old tube radios  jukeboxes but I am thinking he might have hooked up a rectifier or two I will call him
Cam

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 06:28 pm
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Cam Kuruliak
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Finally got it done!!!!!!!!! Thank you Russ Huber,  David Hoatson, Mark Olson and thank you Paul Graves for all your advice and input I would have never got it done without your help fro all of you Now onto my Trojan 5210.  I have it running just need a switch and speed coil for it Yeah I know wishful thinking!!!!!

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