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 Posted: Thu Aug 12th, 2010 10:47 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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Hello,

I just found this group and have a fan problem.  I have an old (no idea on age) Cool Spot by Signal, oscillating pedestal fan with ~4.5" blades. The oscillation mechanism occasionally will loosen so the fan won't oscillate. I've taken it apart and nothing seem broken. However I think there must be a spring missing.

This fan has a knob at the top, rear, of the motor screwed onto a short stem. The bottom of the stem has a raised square ridge across it's middle that fits a matching groove in the top of the lower gear arbor. At the bottom of this arbor the oscillating mechanism attaches, using a D-shaped hole to capture the D-shaped end of the arbor, and a machine screw to hold it on the arbor. I'm thinking there must have been a spring somewhere on this arbor to disengage the oscillating arm when the top knob is either pulled out of the groove or put into the groove. The arbor's range of movement in the gear case is maybe 1/16". Hope I provide enough info here.

Any thoughts?

Alex

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:05 am
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Nicholas Denney
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A Cool Spot PEDESTAL, you say? We're all eyes. :eyes :thumbup

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:36 am
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Duane Burright
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Nicholas Denney wrote: A Cool Spot PEDESTAL, you say? We're all eyes. :eyes :thumbup
I think your friend Kyle has one. I've seen these in the catalog set, there was the model Alex describes which is a 10" and there was also a 16" model as well.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 05:06 am
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Duane Burright
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Alex, your oscillating mechanism likely doesn't have springs in it. I have a few similar fans and the oscillation is engaged with the tension from the knob as you tighten it. I've found after I re-tighten a couple of times it'll work and stay oscillating.

Since you have had it apart, did you clean it out and renew the grease? I usually do that and run a few drops of oil into the rear bearing.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:16 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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Nicholas, I'm not sure what your post means. I'm not a collector so know nothing about my fan, nor it's potential value or, probably, lack there of. I got it from an 80+ y/o neighbor who passed away.

Duane, I'm not sure how to measure a fan, so I gave the approximate blade length. The total span across opposing blades is approximately 9.5".

Alex, your oscillating mechanism likely doesn't have springs in it. I have a few similar fans and the oscillation is engaged with the tension from the knob as you tighten it.

Ok, but I believe my knob is meant for 1/2 turn, either allowing the stem to be in the groove, or pulling the stem up and out of the groove (see my first description).

I've found after I re-tighten a couple of times it'll work and stay oscillating.


Yes I can make it stay oscillating by tightening it. But I believe it should also be able to disengage by the knob.


Since you have had it apart, did you clean it out and renew the grease? I usually do that and run a few drops of oil into the rear bearing.

Yes I cleaned and regreased and oiled the rear bearing. The gears are in excellent shape. The motor makes the case a little hot to the touch after a period, but you can still touch the case.

I'll take a picture of the mechanism today, just have to take it apart again. :)


 

Attached Image (viewed 702 times):

Fan1.JPG

Last edited on Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:52 pm by

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:55 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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Here are 3 pictures of the mechanism.

Fan1 shows the top knob sitting on it's key-shaped bottom on the gear arbor with the arbor's notch or keyway. (gear case top cover removed). At the bottom of the case is the oscillating arm, detached from the above arbor.

Fan2 (slightly blurry) shows that the gear is below the top of the case, however the case has a raised area that prevents the gear from being pulled up.

Fan3 shows the oscillating arm attached and some clearance between the arm and the case. The original screw was missing and I've put a cap screw there for now.

So, how do you think the knob at the top was to function? There is no clearance for it to pull the gear arbor up to disengage the gear. If the knob screw is tight, it cannot be pulled up out of the arbor keyway.

Yes I can tighten the knob screw and tighten the bottom screw, and have continual oscillation. Actually only the bottom screw needs to be tight to the arbor while not binding the oscillating arm for continual oscillation. The top know can fall off and not stop the oscillation.

Alex
PS  Sorry the pics are so large, I'm not good at this.

Attached Image (viewed 694 times):

Fan2.JPG

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 04:55 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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3rd shot

Attached Image (viewed 692 times):

Fan3.JPG

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 08:31 pm
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Duane Burright
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Alex Sallwey wrote: So, how do you think the knob at the top was to function? There is no clearance for it to pull the gear arbor up to disengage the gear. If the knob screw is tight, it cannot be pulled up out of the arbor keyway.

Yes I can tighten the knob screw and tighten the bottom screw, and have continual oscillation. Actually only the bottom screw needs to be tight to the arbor while not binding the oscillating arm for continual oscillation. The top know can fall off and not stop the oscillation.

Basically your oscillator knob should be keyed into the notches and the screw should be tightened down. To make the fan operate in Stationary Mode (no oscillating), just turn the knob counter clockwise. It's not like later model fans where you pull up on the knob to stop the oscillating mechanism. If you keep turning the knob counter clockwise until it tightens against the backstop, it'll lock the fan head in the position you set (it won't flop about) and the fan will still work fine.

To make the fan oscillate, just turn the knob clockwise until it starts oscillating. As I mentioned before, you'll have to likely retighten it a time or two.

HTH.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 13th, 2010 10:21 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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Hmmmm, not sure mine works that way?! If the knob's screw is tight, and the stem is keyed into the notches, there is no way you can turn the knob. This is because the the arbor that the knob's stem keys into contains a solidly mounted gear. This gear engages a worm gear that is turned by the gear at the end of the motor shaft. No gear can be disengaged. What you said makes sense, but I don't think mine works that way. Unless I'm missing something here. I don't want to beat a trivial issue to death here, it all started out of curiosity, and the fan does work fine moving air.

Alex

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 Posted: Sat Aug 14th, 2010 03:41 am
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Logan Brownlie
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I have a table fan like that with the same oscillator.It works like Duane says.The gear should free spin when the oscillating knob is loose.The reason for the notches in the oscillating shaft is so you can remove the knob so the rear motor cover can be removed.Does yours have a rear motor cover?Also that screw at the top of the oscillating knob should be tight not sticking up.




Last edited on Sat Aug 14th, 2010 04:21 am by Logan Brownlie

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 Posted: Sat Aug 14th, 2010 03:46 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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Ah Ha!!!  Your 2nd photo is the solution! The knob's stem screws onto an intermediate shaft that in turn screws onto the gear arbor!

On mine, the intermediate shaft was tight on the arbor. At some point in history someone must have overtightened it because in my handling it, and snugging up the knob screw, it never unscrewed. Therefore it could only cause oscillation.

Now I see it is just a friction grip of the large end of the intermediate shaft against the gear that controls oscillation.

Thank you all for your help, it has been most interesting! Sorry if I used any incorrect terms in describing the parts we have been discussing.

Alex

PS Yes I have the motor cover, and the knob's screw is snug.

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 Posted: Sun Aug 15th, 2010 05:12 am
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Duane Burright
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I had that on one of my fans, what I did was take a fairly long flat bladed screwdriver and put the blade into the slot in the arbor (where the notches on the knob go) on it's side (rather than straight like you would when using it the right way). The idea was to use the screwdriver like a crowbar to get leverage to pop the arbor loose. Once I did that it was easily loosened.

Also, on your fan I'd look into replacing the wiring. I see a lot of tape on it in your pics, new wiring will make it much safer.

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 Posted: Sun Aug 15th, 2010 05:16 am
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Duane Burright
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Alex Sallwey wrote: The motor makes the case a little hot to the touch after a period, but you can still touch the case.

That's normal. I have a few Signal that will get very hot to the touch (like you can only touch the motor for two seconds.) Yet in my testing they are fine (they use just under the tag rating for amps and wattage) and they'll run for days like that (yes, I've run 'em 24 by 7).

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 Posted: Sun Aug 15th, 2010 08:50 pm
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Alex Sallwey
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Good to know they run a little hot. I've never been too concerned as I could still touch it.

Yes the wiring is more than old. I've been thinking of digging through my wife's Christmas lights because I believe she has a green extension cord.  I've got to make a Home Depot run soon and I'll check there also.

This should have been in my first posting, but better late than never. My fan is model #562.

Thanks again for the help.

Alex

Last edited on Sun Aug 15th, 2010 08:50 pm by

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 Posted: Sun Aug 15th, 2010 11:54 pm
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Duane Burright
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A fellow Signal enthusiast I know uses those green Christmas extension cords on his fans. If you don't care about originality you could also just get some 18 gauge lamp cord at the local Home Depot.

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