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Hey...another beginner question, bakelite and general lubrication  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Sep 14th, 2017 05:31 am
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John Nyman
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Hello, just a couple questions. I've got a Westinghouse 1940s, Pacemaker I think, with a bakelite blade. Someone painted the whole thing green and I'm wondering if there are any tricks to getting the paint off the bakelite without hurting it too much. 00 steel wool is my only thought for now....  also....I'm buying, refurbishing and selling a good few old fans lately and have yet to find a one-size-fits-all solution for lubrication. Some older motors like Century's seem to like mineral oil, some like a light oil and some are fine with 10w40. I'm going with Marvel Mystery oil just because it's been reliable in the past but want to see if you all have a go-to lube for bearings and such. Any thoughts appreciated...sorry no pics for the Westinghouse...it's in pieces and besides, it's "custom" paint job is pretty grim looking right now. Gracias

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 Posted: Thu Sep 14th, 2017 06:20 am
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Charlie Forster
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You can use the 20 or 30 weight none detergent motor oil  or there is 3 N 1 Blue label for fractional hp motors , Zoom spout and several other
What you want to do is clean the old oil and grease out and replace it with these new oils!
The oils back in the day was from animal fat that and dust and dirt and time it gets hard and that is why you want to clean it out.
you don't want to use the penetrating oils like WD40 ETC.
I use red and tacky in the gear boxes.
I think your blades are MICARTA  and you want to be careful with then as they can chip or crack .So be careful with them if they are Mica or Bakelite
Some one else may chime in on how to refinish them.
welcome to the forum a lot of info here.

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 Posted: Thu Sep 14th, 2017 11:08 am
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Lane Shirey
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You can sand the paint off of micarta blade and then repaint it. I'd be careful with solvents. Micarta is different than Bakelite.  If you were trying to save the original paint by trying to remove the added paint, good luck, as the original paint was applied quite thin and is easily dissolved by any solvent that would remove the secondary paint. 

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 Posted: Thu Sep 14th, 2017 03:53 pm
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John Nyman
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Ok, that leads to another question. This fan has a green badge which is original to it, and the blade is also green but the paint is flaking badly...and the whole fan has been paint-bombed green as well...so the question is do you think Westinghouse would match an emblem and blade the same color...in a 1940s 16 inch Pacemaker? Or from a different angle, did they ever leave a synthetic blade un-painted? Thank you Charlie, thanks Lane

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P_20170914_105059.jpg

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 Posted: Fri Sep 15th, 2017 12:16 pm
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Lane Shirey
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To the best of my knowledge, Westinghouse never used green. 

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 Posted: Sat Sep 16th, 2017 03:58 am
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John Nyman
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Someone painted it poorly...the badge has a green hue to it, maybe from overspray but it sure looks dark green-ish to me, and not the shade that was sprayed on the rest of it...pic attached

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P_20170915_225149.jpg

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 Posted: Sat Sep 16th, 2017 04:09 am
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John Nyman
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Also, as I remove the green sprayed on crap I've noticed what looks like a few remnents of a darker green in the corners where it was hard to remove...curious, and alsoalso the metal used is not steel or iron, it's either aluminum or pot-metal...and I think it's the latter because of some casting irregularities. Maybe it's from the war years what with the synthetic blade. I can tell you though that this one is being a stubborn little turd, the screws holding the nose cover on are this close to getting stripped...they've been soaking for 2 days and just won't let go. Stubborn little crap...if the blade and cage were not so good I'd probably junk this project

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 Posted: Sun Sep 17th, 2017 02:00 am
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Levi Mevis
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if the fan is cast aluminum or pot metal (Zinc alloy) then possibly the screws have galvanized into place over the years because of metal disimilarities (cast aluminum or pot metal fan bodies and steel screws do not mix well). And no your fan is not from during WWII as there weren't any fans made for the civilian market during WWII, cast aluminum bodies on fans (and even pot metal) was very common on lower end fans from the late 1940s to the late 1950s. Your fan was NOT one of Westinghouse's higer end fans and actually uses a shaded pole motor I believe because of it being a lower end model. 
Hope this helps.


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 Posted: Sun Sep 17th, 2017 05:33 am
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John Nyman
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Thanks Levi, I'm still learning about old fans and their motors and I really do appreciate your input...and this explains why those screws are still so fornicatingly stubborn, now 3 day later...friggin bastages!!  Thank you sir

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 Posted: Sun Sep 17th, 2017 01:22 pm
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Levi Mevis
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You're welcome, glad I could help!

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