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Hey Vintage Dudes  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Sun Mar 28th, 2010 11:46 pm
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Russ Huber
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Who made the the "Coronados" that look like Manning-Bowmans that look like Zeros for Gambles stores? Just in case your confused about what I just said...who made the Coronado fans? When did they start making Coronados? :wondering: Thanks!

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 12:12 am
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Raymond Lowry
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McGRAW EDISON COMPANY, BERSTED MANUFACTURING DIVISION, BOONVILLE MISSOURI.

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 12:37 am
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Don Whipple
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And, Cornanados were sold at "Gamble's"- a chain outfit that sold housewares and appliances thru the 1970s.  I think the company headquarters was in Minnesota.  Had quite a few of them in the Midwest when I was a kid.

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 12:59 am
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Russ Huber
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McGraw Edison came into being in 57. I have a rubber blade Coronado here using a 30s Samson rubber blade patent. Are you telling me this thing would date 57 or later?

Last edited on Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:02 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:18 am
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Greg Miller
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Ah, yes... that would explain all of the clones of this thing. Different brand names for different stores... Different guard, paint, and center badge and there you have it... "different enough" fan...

Attached Image (viewed 3474 times):

DSCN0643.JPG

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:26 am
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Russ Huber
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Greg Miller wrote:
Ah, yes... that would explain all of the clones of this thing. Different brand names for different stores... Different guard, paint, and center badge and there you have it... "different enough" fan...

Bersted has CCW rotation, the Coronados are CW. Don't know what to think...Ray says they were made by McGraw Edison..but a rubber blade model late 50s?
:wondering:

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:34 am
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Greg Miller
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I've seen pics of Coronados that were virtually identical to the little 8"er that I have, but I suppose that a couple of different manufaturers could have badged them as Coronados. It certainly wouldn't be the first case of that happening...

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:37 am
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Nicholas Denney
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Russ Huber wrote:
Bersted has CCW rotation, the Coronados are CW.
:wondering:

Nope! Some Coronados are CW, some are CCW.... it just..... depends. :clap:

http://fans.dangeroustacos.com/galleries/portable/coronado/index.htm

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:38 am
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Greg Miller
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Here's the pic I was thinking of. Scroll down a little and you'll see what I mean... http://afca.mywowbb.com/forum2/12607.html

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 01:58 am
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Russ Huber
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Nicholas is on a roll tonight and very right. :D The Coronado on the left..CCW...the Coronado on the right...CW. The Coronado rubber blade indicates it was made for Associates Inc. on the label ....not Gambles. The blue one was marketed by Gambles. So...how do you date these things? Did McGraw Edison make them for sure 57 or later? :wondering:

Attached Image (viewed 3463 times):

Coronado1.jpg

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 02:30 am
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Russ Huber
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Al Bersted wanted it all. He swallowed United Electrical Manufacturing Co. mid to late 30s(Eskimo)along with other companies, and in 41 according to this WEB link gobbled up Manning-Bowman. McGraw Electric RE-purchased Bersted back in 48. Then in 57 McGraw merged with Edison. These Coronados sure look like Zeros don't they? Funny thing...wonder if Coronado was a tradmark name like the Grainger Daytons? You see the name Dayton...but not the manufacturers name...Grainger. Hmmmmm.:wondering:

http://www.jitterbuzz.com/bersted.html

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 02:41 am
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Raymond Lowry
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WELL I CAN REMEMBER SEEING IN THE WESTERN AUTO STORE HERE IN THE EARLY 60'S THE FAN LIKE YOUR CORANODO BUT THEY WERE LABELED ZERO, ESKIMO ETC BUT THEY WERE MADE FOR WESTERN AUTO. ALL THESE FANS LOOK THE SAME OVER THE YEARS, THEY WERE ALL MADE BY THE SAME COMPANY.

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 02:48 am
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Russ Huber
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Raymond Lowry wrote: WELL I CAN REMEMBER SEEING IN THE WESTERN AUTO STORE HERE IN THE EARLY 60'S THE FAN LIKE YOUR CORANODO BUT THEY WERE LABELED ZERO, ESKIMO ETC BUT THEY WERE MADE FOR WESTERN AUTO. ALL THESE FANS LOOK THE SAME OVER THE YEARS, THEY WERE ALL MADE BY THE SAME COMPANY.
From that link I posted above Ray...your pretty much right...I think.  It is like they ALL merged into one... Bersted...United Electric...Manning-Bowman...Mcgraw...Edison...Coronado must be a trademark name for Mcgraw or Mcgraw-Edison?

Last edited on Mon Mar 29th, 2010 03:01 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 02:56 am
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Raymond Lowry
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RIGHT RUSS, THEY WERE ALL TOGETHER BECAUSE THE FAN STYLE DID NOT CHANGE, I HAVE ONE WITH THE TOASTMASTER NAME AND ONE WITH SIGNATURE ON IT WHICH WAS MONTGOMERY WARD.

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 03:38 am
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Greg Miller
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Russ Huber wrote: Al Bersted wanted it all. He swallowed United Electrical Manufacturing Co. mid to late 30s(Eskimo)along with other companies, and in 41 according to this WEB link gobbled up Manning-Bowman. McGraw Electric RE-purchased Bersted back in 48. Then in 57 McGraw merged with Edison. These Coronados sure look like Zeros don't they? Funny thing...wonder if Coronado was a tradmark name like the Grainger Daytons? You see the name Dayton...but not the manufacturers name...Grainger. Hmmmmm.:wondering:

http://www.jitterbuzz.com/bersted.html

Great link- I've actually seen the page dedicated to the "drug store" fans and specifically the Zero a while back. I didn't read the whole thing, but I caught the words "mechanically junk, but they are also quite rare" and decided to dig mine out and bring it back into service. There is another thread attached if you poke around a little... that's where I saw this.

Attached Image (viewed 3322 times):

flex_fan_ad.jpg

Last edited on Mon Mar 29th, 2010 03:41 am by Greg Miller

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 07:33 pm
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Thomas Peters
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Gambles(Gamble-Skogmo) used Coronado as a proprietary(trademarked) house brand on both fans and radios, just as Sears(Sears-Roebuck) used Homart and Silvertone.

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 08:26 pm
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Russ Huber
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Thomas Peters wrote:
Gambles(Gamble-Skogmo) used Coronado as a proprietary(trademarked) house brand on both fans and radios, just as Sears(Sears-Roebuck) used Homart and Silvertone.

Ya...that works for the blue one. :up: Now....explain this? Do you think Mcgraw/Mcgraw Edison used Coronado as a tradmark name and dumped their junk on places like this? :wondering:

Attached Image (viewed 3319 times):

fans 1 1339.jpg

Last edited on Mon Mar 29th, 2010 08:29 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 08:55 pm
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Thomas Peters
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Dumped their junk, ouch?

It would go something like this: Someone at Gambles decides that they need to offer a line of fans that will carry their trademarked name(Coronado). Shop the list around to whatever companies that do contract work in that field. Whoever can deliver your specifications, at the lowest price, in the shortest time, gets the contract

 

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 09:38 pm
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Russ Huber
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Thomas Peters wrote:
Dumped their junk, ouch?

Easy dude...:wondering: I never claimed to do magic using the English language. :tumbs Ya...sounds good...you must of worked for Gambles huh? I can vaguely recall all the junk they used to sell come to think of it. Thanks! :clap: :bigfan

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 Posted: Mon Mar 29th, 2010 10:49 pm
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Thomas Peters
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Never worked for Gamble. Have seen and or owned a fan or radio with their Coronado brand at times.

I just figure that they and their products, are no better or worse than what other mass marketers were offering.

It continues to happen in business, there are too many trying to sell the same types of products.

The herd will be thinned.

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 Posted: Tue Mar 30th, 2010 01:30 pm
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Michael Mirin
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1907



Max McGraw establishes Interstate Electric Manufacturing Company.




1910



Interstate Electric and Manufacturing Company formed. It combined Interstate Supply and Interstate Manufacturing into one company.



1912



Joseph R. Lehmer Company acquired by Interstate Electric and Manufacturing Company. The two companies are combined into a new McGraw Electric Company. McGraw Electric Company established a utility, Central Electric and Gas Company in South Dakota, which, in turn, established a subsidiary, Central Telephone.



1919



Charles Strite applies for a patent for the first automatic pop-up toaster, which was intended to be sold to the restaurant trade.



1921



Waters Genter Company is formed to manufacture Strite's toaster and market it to restaurants.



1926



The Waters Genter Company begins selling the Toastmaster model 1-A-1, the first automatic pop-up toaster made for home use. McGraw Electric acquired the Bersted Manufacturing Company, Chicago; the wholesale operation of McGraw Electric sold to Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company.



1928



McGraw Electric acquired the Clark Water Heater Company, and the Bussmann Compa
Model 1-A-1






1900



Max McGraw establishes McGraw Electric Company, Sioux City, Iowa.




1903



McGraw Electric reorganized into Interstate Supply Company.

ny (fuses



1929



McGraw Electric acquired Waters Genter Company, Minneapolis (Toastmaster) from Max McGraw who had bought it personally in 1926.



1930



McGraw Electric sold Bersted Manufacturing Company back to Alfred Bersted.



1936



Toastmaster toasters incorporate a pneumatic shock absorber for the bread carriage making for a smoother, quieter toasting operation.



1939



Hinged crumb trays are introduced on the new line of Toastmaster toasters.



1939



McGraw Electric acquired the "Focolipse" heater from Pitt Corporation.



1944



McGraw Electric's plant in Elgin, Illinois becomes a war plant, suspending production of its popular appliances for three years in order to manufacture projectiles including ammunition for the famous aircraft gun known as the "Chicago Piano."



1947



Model 1B14 is introduced. The toaster remained a staple in the Toastmaster line until 1961, winning the title of the world's most popular toaster for more than a decade.



1948



McGraw Electric re-purchased the Bersted Manufacturing Company from Al Bersted. Bersted, meanwhile, had acquired United Electrical Manufacturing Company, Adrian, Michigan, ("Eskimo" fans); Swartzbaugh Manufacturing Company, Toledo, ("Everhot" appliances); and Manning-Bowman & Company, Meriden, Connecticut (appliances); acquired the "Tip-Toe" iron from Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company; acquired Edison of Canada Limited.



1949



McGraw Electric acquired Line Material Company, Canada (power line equipment).



1950



The Toastmaster "Powermatic" self-lowering toaster is introduced (model 1B16). Its improved "Superflex" time compensated for voltage surges.



1951



McGraw Electric acquired Tropic-Aire Incorporated (bus air conditioning).



1952



McGraw Electric Pan American Corporation established to engage in operations in Western Hemisphere.



1953



McGraw Electric Company moves its manufacturing facilities to Missouri.



1954



McGraw Electric acquired the appliance business of General Mills.



1956



Toastmaster responds to early signs of "countertop crunch" with the debut of the most popular compact toaster yet. Although the 1B21 weighed four pounds versus the 6-lb. market standard, it toasted any size bread.



1956



W. E. Moore & Company (industrial dryers), Speed Queen Corporation (home laundry equipment manufacturer), Lectromelt Furnace Corporation acquired.



1957



McGraw Electric Company acquires Thomas A. Edison Industries. Ingraham Time Products, founded in 1918, is part of the deal. Corporate name changed to McGraw-Edison Company. An era of significant expansion begins. Of acquisitions, Founder/President Max McGraw was fond of saying: "Never buy a company unless it's making money or seems about to go broke." Acquired Griswold Manufacturing Company, part of which it sold to Acquired Vermont Division of Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation (portable electric tools). Acquired Sancor Instrument Corporation, Neptune, New Jersey (precision gears). Acquired All-Over Manufacturing Company, Racine (hair clippers for home use).



1958



McGraw-Edison acquired Heatube Company (heating elements) and National Electric Coil Company. Sold Griswold to Wagner.



1959



Merged Canadian Line Materials Limited and Thomas A. Edison (Canada) into McGraw-Edison (Canada) Limited.



1960



McGraw-Edison acquired American Laundry Machinery Company (commercial laundry equipment).



1961



McGraw-Edison acquired Canadian Laundry Machinery Company Limited and Huebsch Canada Limited, and merged them into McGraw-Edison (Canada) Limited.



1962



McGraw-Edison acquired certain product lines from Federal Pacific Electric Company (utility equipment) and W. F. Meyer & Son.



1963



McGraw-Edison acquired the Daven Division of General Mills Incorporated (electric components).



1965



McGraw-Edison established Prestige Edison Limited, a joint venture with Prestige Limited, subsidiary of Ekco Products Company, England. Acquired Village Blacksmith Company, Watertown, Wisconsin (garden goods). Liquidated Thomas A. Edison (United Kingdom), and Pohatcong R.R. Also sold Medical Gas Division of Thomas A. Edison Company, Wood Products Division and Elgin Real Estate. Formed joint venture between Line Materials Industries Division and Secode Corporation, subsidiary of Magnetic Controls Company to produce electric utility control equipment.



1966



The world's best selling electric waffle iron, model W252, debuts. It remained in the Toastmaster product line until 1997.



1967



McGraw-Edison acquired Halo Lighting Incorporated (lighting fixtures). Sold the Lectromelt Furnace Division. Acquired Ingraham Company (clocks).



1968



McGraw-Edison acquired Toledo Kitchen Machines Division of Reliance Electric and Engineering Company.



1969



McGraw-Edison acquired the fibre pipe business of the Brown Company. Acquired Simplicity Products Limited (Canada) (home laundry appliances) and General Electric's power tool business.



1970



McGraw-Edison acquired Fairgrieve & Son Limited (Canada) (home laundry appliances) and some appliance lines from Landers, Frary & Clark (Canada).



1971



Painted and woodgrain appliances become increasingly popular. Decorative toasters join other fashion oriented products for the home. While chrome remained the most popular finish, some models were available with decorated front panels. You could also get toasters in harvest gold and avocado! Acquired Comar Electric Company (relays and switches).



1972



McGraw-Edison acquired Brevel Products Corporation (small electric motors) and the power tool line of G. W. Murphy Company, Houston, Texas.



1976



The Toastmaster Bicentennial toaster hits the retail shelves.



1978



The first model B700 two-slice toaster - destined to become America's most popular toaster - rolls off the assembly line.



1980



Seven executives form Toastmaster Incorporated following a leveraged buy-out of the Portable Appliance and Tool Group division from McGraw-Edison. The company is later purchased by Magic Chef, Inc., which is subsequently acquired by the Maytag Company. Welcome to the eighties!



1985



First under-cabinet toaster is introduced.



1987



A second leveraged buy-out by management acquires Toastmaster from the Maytag Company.



1989



The 16 millionth B700 series toaster is manufactured.



1990



The first cool touch, steel-sided toaster, appropriately named the Toastmaster "Cool Steel," is introduced.



1992



Toastmaster becomes a publicly held corporation following an offering of its common stock on March 3. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange as TM.



1996



The Toastmaster "Bagel Perfect" toaster targets a dramatic surge in bagel consumption.



1998



Toastmaster displayed three new appliances, including a toaster, designed in Germany by F. A. Porsche (an industrial design firm started in the 1970s by Ferdinand Porsche, designer of the original Porsche 911 sports car) at the January Housewares Show in Chicago.



1999



Salton Inc. acquires Toastmaster, Inc.

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 Posted: Tue Mar 30th, 2010 01:35 pm
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Michael Mirin
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 AL Bersted Story aka Eskimo!

 

STORY

"Dear Paul, - I'm sorry to be so late in thanking you for the very good write up you did on our town Booneville, (Booneville MO), naming their new street "Al Bersted Drive". I had some extra copies made and have sent one to Ed and Louise Elkington who now live in Las Vegas, NV. Also one to Adam and Alyce dicken who live in Indiana near Louisville, KY. Also want to send a few to some of the salesmen I know are still among the living.

Helen Cotter lives here in Booneville and she sends her very best regards. She is still employed part-time, having retired from McGraw in 1970.

George retired i 1971, and I retired in 1975.

Mrs. George Schmidt"


 


 Another big story in 1934 was an announcement that the Bersted Electrical Manufacturing Co. of Chicago, makers of the well-known and popular "Bersted" brand of household appliances, would be manufacturing their products in Fostoria early in April.

Company president Al Bersted and his secretary arrived in Fostoria on Jan. 24 to sign agreements between the firm and the Fostoria Industrial Corporation.

The new industry would be housed in the former Evans Lead Co. plant and an additional building was to be erected immediately. This was expected to lead to the employment of 150 to 200 Fostorians.

 

 term "Drug Store Appliances" refers to low-quality, cheaply made versions of toasters, fans, mixers, and the like that were mass-marketed by chain stores. The history of these items centers in one small midwestern town. So, let us now speed off to Fostoria, Ohio.

Fostoria is located in Northwest Ohio approximately 40 miles southeast of Toledo. Columbus, Cleveland and Detroit are all within two hours travel. In the 1930s, Fostoria was a major rail junction for a number of major carriers, providing excellent opportunities for national distribution of manufactured products. Because of this, industry was fairly well established, although no products of national priminence were manufactured there. The one "quality" company that bears the Fostoria name is located somewhere else, an interesting story in its own right

A Brief Diversion to the Fostoria Glass Company


 


The Fostoria Glass Company began as a glass-producing house in 1887. It was initially located in Fostoria, Ohio, because a large natural gas field had been "discovered", supposedly providing a cheap source of heat for the furnaces. Although the townspeople of Fostoria, Ohio had given their land to the glass company for free, Fostoria Glassworks was unable to remain because the gas field proved to be nonexistent. The promise of more abundant resources for producing glass caused the company’s leaders to move to Moundsville, WV. In 1891, the company built one furnace capable of firing 14 pieces, a remarkable achievement for the late 19th century glassworks industry. This furnace continued to produce glass until 1972,and Fostoria is known for a very large number of collectible glass lines.

Enter Al Bersted


 


Albert Bersted is one of the most famous and notorious "wheeler-dealers" in the crazy world of consumer appliances. He was a talented engineer and a financial manipulator who formed companies, sold them, then bought them back and created conglomerations with dizzying speed. He began in Chicago with a small outfit that made resistance heat appliances (toasters, hot plates, hair dryers and the like.) Here is an example of one of the Chicago factory's products. It is not very appealing.

This was a particularly good time to be in this business because the "pop-up" toaster was all the rage in 1926 -- it was sort of like plasma screen TVs in 2004 -- trendy people just had to have one, and they would pay $30 for it when the average man would work all day for less that $2. ($30 in 1925 is equivalent to $900 in 2005!). The McGraw Electric Company was in the business of generating electricity AND selling appliances -- given the vast sums to be made, they bought everything in sight that even looked like it might be capable of making toasters. Thus, in 1926, Al Bersted sold his Chicago company to McGraw Electric, making his first major score.

Skipping ahead to 1934, the Big Story in Fostoria was an announcement in the Gazette that "...the Bersted Electrical Manufacturing Co. of Chicago, makers of the well-known and popular 'Bersted' brand of household appliances, would be moving to town early in April. The new industry will be housed in the former Evans Lead Co. plant and an additional building is to be erected immediately. This is expected to lead to the employment of 150 to 200 Fostorians..." There was no mention that Bersted manufacturing had been totally absorbed in McGraw.

 


Company president Al Bersted and his secretary arrived in Fostoria on Jan. 24 to sign agreements between the firm and the Fostoria Industrial Corporation, the town's Booster Club. The Bersted Corporation was, in fact, just Al and his "secretary." Thus began an amazing saga of cut-rate appliance manufacture.

In fact, Al Bersted was a genius -- a peculiar kind of genius, but a genius nonetheless. He had the ability to take an appliance apart -- any appliance, mind you -- and figure out how to manufacture it cheaply. In general, Bersted's creations were "cheap and cheesy" -- chrome plating was thin, wood was used instead of Bakelite, heating wires would be an inch apart instead of a quarter inch. Al had his eyes on the vast market -- the millions of average Americans with $2-$5 to spend on an appliance. Al's creations are not in museums and most of them were junk six months after they were purchased, but he made money. Lots of it.

Al had accomplices in his plans -- namely the big chain stores that were sweeping the country. Of note, the first mass-market "discounters" were Drug Stores. In order to use their facilities when people were "healthy" as well as "sick", Drug Stores started offering both food service and a line of consumer goods, particularly appliances. This was especially relevant since most pharmacies were allowed to be open Late and on Sundays. The fact that drug stores also sold "medicinal alcohol" during Prohibition was another draw... [pharmacies that have survived intact from this period have a curious "back room" where local dignitaries could take their "prescription" -- a.k.a. a "short snort"]. Al Bersted made an alliance with the Rexall Chain and later Walgreens. History has memorialized Bersted's products as "Drug Store Appliances."

During the period 1935-1941, Bersted used his profits to acquire United Electrical Manufacturing Company, Adrian, Michigan, ("Eskimo" fans); Swartzbaugh Manufacturing Company, Toledo, ("Everhot" appliances);the "Tip-Toe" iron from Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company; and Edison of Canada Limited. During the war years, Bersted was able to acquire materials and keep the flow of goods running strong when his competitors could not.

Other companies did not fare so well. In 1941, Bersted acquired his "Crown Jewel" -- Manning-Bowman & Company, Meriden, Connecticut -- largely because M-B could not obtain the chrome that was key to its ultra-high quality products. The Manning-Bowman Company was considered to be the "Cadillac" of marks, making products which found their way into the homes of the very wealthy and to those more humble homes of the middle class who aspired to higher station. Whether is was a butler, maid, or homemaker who served guests in ware made by Manning-Bowman, the items were always well-designed and seemed to last forever. (This of course can be a problem if you are trying to sell large volumes of consumer goods, year-in and year-out. ) Nevertheless, authentic Manning-Bowman products, especially those with the "M-B Means Best" logo are among the most prized deco artifacts.

Most of the well-known appliances designs for which the Manning-Bowman company were known before war now were moved to Fostoria for "re-use" with planned obsolescence in mind. The post-war period proved a difficult one for what was left of M-B. Since Bersted used designs that had not changed much from the Art Deco period, they met with limited acceptance by trendy sophisticates. What was left was the Drugstore market. By 1951, no appliances were made with the (now) thoroughly devalued Manning-Bowman name. Our poor little drugstore grill (below) is yet more evidence of the effect of corporate shennanigans on quality. You will see this theme repeated throughout these pages. Corporate takeovers result in low quality products and eventually the public catches on!

Click Here for a more detailed discussion of Manning-Bowman designs to contrast them with the drugstore artifacts shown below.

Nobody has ever gone broke underestimating American taste. In 1948,McGraw Electric re-purchased the Bersted Manufacturing Company and Al started off to make another fortune... again and again.

Bersted products are made of low quality materials, they do not perform their function well, and they break down quickly. As such, they have little intrinsic value -- you can't really use them (as we use our up-scale appliances) on a daily basis. However, since they are relatively rare, they are of some interest to the collector . However, they are "rare" because they broke down almost immediately.

As you will see in the next series of photos, a surprising number of Bersted appliances from the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s have been "found" in new, unused condition, very often with the original boxes and cord tags!

 

 On our Fan Page, we discuss the so-called "Drugstore Fans" that are collectible because not many of them survived the test of time... So it is for other electrical appliances. Bersted made both the "Zero" fan and the "Eskimo" fan, brand-names that would suggest their cooling power...
 

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 Posted: Tue Mar 30th, 2010 07:05 pm
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Nicholas Denney
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"By 1951, no appliances were made with the (now) thoroughly devalued Manning-Bowman name."

I see little truth in that, unless several fans and an appliance or two that I own are 20+ years older than I thought they were....

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 Posted: Tue Mar 30th, 2010 08:37 pm
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Raymond Lowry
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THAT FOR SURE IS NOT TRUE, I HAVE SOME WITH THE MANNING BOWMAN NAME THAT I KNOW WERE MADE IN THE 60'S.

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 Posted: Thu Apr 1st, 2010 02:32 pm
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Tom Zapf
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western auto nameplate was Wizard.... Top of the line was Imperial series Wizard brand

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 Posted: Thu Apr 1st, 2010 02:34 pm
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Tom Zapf
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Joined: Tue Feb 24th, 2009
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i do believe these were referred to as Drugstore Fans because they were so inexpensive. Did Rexall also sell a version called Rexaire or something like that?

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