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Westinghouse 16SD Motor Removal  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Mon May 7th, 2018 10:31 pm
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Stan Stone
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Hello to everyone.  I'm new to restoring vintage fans, but already enjoying myself.  I bought a Westinghouse 16SD that is really, really dirty and with a badly flaking paint job, but has all it's parts and works nicely in all three speeds.  I'm out to clean it up, give it a new paint job, lubricate what needs to be and put it to use.
Stripper works really well on the aluminum cast housing, so the paint job shouldn't be bad.  I am having trouble though getting the motor loose from the front housing and hoped someone could offer some advice.

There are two bolts that have flat screw heads on the outside of the housing and nuts on the motor frame side.  These obviously need to come out before the housing will come off.  The nuts come loose pretty easily, but the bolts don't seem to want to slide out.  One of them turns from the screw head (but won't back out) the other won't turn at all.

Does anyone know whether anything other thank dirt and old grease could be holding these in?  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

p.s. I think this is a fairly common fan, so I'm hoping some folks know what I'm dealing with.  If the description doesn't do it for you, let me know and I'll sort out some pictures.

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 Posted: Wed May 9th, 2018 04:53 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Does your Westinghouse look like this? 


This was my first Westy restoration and I had a heck of a time getting the casing opened so I could rewire it and paint it. The nuts on the long rods that hold the case together should come out relatively easily. You really only need to take the screw off the end that faces the back of the case. The nut on the front (that is behind the octagonal shaped head does not come off. Take the nut off the back and push the rod through to the front. That little nut in the front (behind the octagonal head that holds the bracket onto the case) is what the cage bracket sits on. The nut provides a spacer so that the cage bracket doesn't sit directly on the case. Getting the case open is a bit of a trick. The members here turned me on to a knife that I bought that helped> read about it here:

http://www.afcaforum.com/forum1/51063.html

Be patient as you tap the knife and the case will slowly come apart. Don't let the knife jump around or you will nick the case. These old Westy's are much more difficult (in my opinion) to restore than the GE's of the same period. 

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 Posted: Thu May 10th, 2018 04:07 am
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Stan Stone
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This is not actually my fan.  I am trying hard to get my fan to look this good, but this is the same model.  These pictures were actually "borrowed" from a Christopher Harding post in September 2016.  I made the rookie mistake of not grabbing any pictures until mine was already in pieces.  Suffice to say, my fan looks a lot like this after spending a long time in a really nasty factory somewhere :D


Like your (really nice) fan, the housing comes apart in two pieces, split at the middle.  This one is actually an aluminum casting and separating the two pieces was pretty simple.  Two side screws in the casting and the back of the housing just came loose.  The problem then was when I wanted to take two similar looking screws loose in the front of the housing to free up the motor and gearbox.




The other end of these have nuts and lock washers on them, tightening up as bolts to the gearbox frame.





The nuts and lock washers came off fairly easily, but at that point one screw would spin but not back out and the other wouldn't even spin.  I was hoping someone could reassure me these were just through bolts and weren't held in by anything else in the motor frame.  After giving them about a 16 hour soak in some pb blaster with no change, I decided to take a deep breath and get a bigger hammer and a rod.  Eventually, both came out.  A few taps of the shaft later and the rotor, stator and gearbox all came out (yipee!!).

That got me to the point where I could get the hardened grease off everything and strip all the old paint.

One thing that is still an issue is the oscillator linkage (in the green square).  I can't see any way to remove this from the fan housing.  The set screw loosens to allow the mount to turn 90 degrees, but that doesn't seem to allow anything to slide or screw off.  My understanding is that turning this ring changes the oscillation based on whether you have the fan upright or hanging on the wall.

Does anyone have any ideas of how this linkage might come apart?  I think I can mask things well enough to paint the assembly, but it would be easier and a better job if I could do it in pieces.  Also, I can see enough to know there is some rust and dirt inside the linkage that I'd like to clean up and re-grease.

Thanks for the help.  Still having fun with it.





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 Posted: Thu May 10th, 2018 04:11 pm
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David Kilnapp
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That's a pretty fan. I usually don't have too much difficulty getting the rotating piece off after you take the set screw off on GE's. Westinghouse fans are a different story. Perhaps one of the forum members can weigh in. Maybe you don't really need to take it off? By the way, the paint colors are sometimes challenging to match (if you go to Home Depot or Lowe's or someplace like that). I have had pretty good luck matching colors by going to an auto parts store and looking at the Dupli Color rack. There are a TON of auto color paints to choose from that are a better match. For black, I always use appliance epoxy paint which you can get at Home Depot. It's very durable and inexpensive. Takes longer to dry (usually over night). It's not as good as powercoating which is the really the best way to finish old fans. I need to learn how to do that if I am going to be a serious collector.
Best of luck with what you are doing. It's a ton of fun and the people on this forum are very helpful.

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 Posted: Thu May 17th, 2018 01:55 pm
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Michael Heffernan
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Stan,
The problem you are having is caused by the oxidation of the aluminum. What I do is to loosen the back nuts 2 turns. Tap them with a hammer to push them forward. Then loosen them some more and re tap them until they are as far as they will go. Try to spray WD 40 on the shaft of the screw from the front. Then try to turn the screw to loosen it. When all else fails I tap them with the nut as far forward as they will go then I use a nail set to drive them as far as I can. At this point you can usually rock the rotor and get it out. Continue to free up the bolts then use WD 40 and emery to clean them. Jope this helps
Mike

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