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Hand polishing brass  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 03:56 am
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Jim Roadt
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I have read many post about polishing brass and have gotten halfway decent at it using a buffing wheel.

The six wing Emersons , however, are difficult and almost deadly using a wheel. I am looking for a good way to hand polish them

I do not want to remove blades and polish on wheel and re rivet them

I have used the lysol and 0000 steel wool to get the old lacquer off and just want them a little nicer I am not lookiing for mirror like finish, I do not have that much time or patience

Thanks

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 04:45 am
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William Dunlap
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Use Mothers or Simichrome with your steel wool. Polish afterward with a cloth. Takes time and elbow grease, but the results are worth it, I think.
You can use some 600 wet or dry for deeper marks and the steel wool will remove the sanding marks.
Polishing a six wing blade with a buffing rig is risky business, that's for sure.
Cheers,
Bill

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 08:13 am
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Steven P Dempsey
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Yeah, Mother's Mag Wheel polish, on some deep blemishes I use a dremmel tool & a buffing tool.

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 01:07 pm
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Cam Kuruliak
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Everybody has their preference mine Is Flitz polish but I never have used steel wool with it I am going to have to try that
Good luck

Cam

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 02:04 pm
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Jim Humphrey
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Jim,

I love the Simichrome polish, but I think it's mostly whatever you've had success with that makes a product your favorite.  As far as buffing, I've got a couple of worn out buffing wheels, originally 6" that are now around 4" or a little under, one hard, one soft, that I use with the green compound for the first round, red compound on the soft wheel for a final polish.  The undersize wheels get into the tight places better than a good new wheel.  I do the really tight areas like around the fingers on the spider using simichrome on cloth.  But as with a lot of things, YMMV.


Jim

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 07:21 pm
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Nathan Britt
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I like to use a mandrel mounted wheel from Dico in a drill. You can rig the trigger to run at much lower RPMs, which reduces the chances of ruining your blades. In my opinion, this method is far better than hand polishing with Brasso or similar products, and it gets pretty close to the results you can get on a buffer. 

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 07:32 pm
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Nathan Britt
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It won't remove deep pitting, but if you get the brass pretty clean first It looks decent.

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 10:08 pm
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Richard Daugird
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Nathan Britt wrote: I like to use a mandrel mounted wheel from Dico in a drill. You can rig the trigger to run at much lower RPMs, which reduces the chances of ruining your blades. In my opinion, this method is far better than hand polishing with Brasso or similar products, and it gets pretty close to the results you can get on a buffer. 
What size do you use? I see some 2"x1/8" on their website, but can't find them for sale.

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 Posted: Mon Nov 18th, 2019 10:19 pm
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Lane Shirey
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If you have a good compressor , buy an air powered angle die grinder. Use a 3” buff with a 1/4” mandrel. I buy them preassembled and toss them when they’re worn

Then for the hard to reach areas. On the same tool I use a 2” roloc attachment with a 3” felt roloc buff disk. 

Very easy to maneuver with little risk of it flying across the room. I’ll try to post pics tomorrow. 

I actually have 5 of the angle die grinders because I get tired of changing the wheels. 

I have the following on them. All have a 1/4” mandrel. 

Coarse wire wheel for grinding paint off of Emersons
Fine wire wheel
Sewn 3” buff for Tripoli 
Loose flannel buff for Red Rouge
2” roloc attachment for sanding discs or felt buff mentioned above. 

I hope that helps out. 

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 Posted: Tue Nov 19th, 2019 03:50 am
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Nathan Britt
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Dico spiral sewn buffing wheel mandril mounted I use the spiral sewn wheel with tripoli and then go over it with white rouge on the floppy wheel.
Dico floppy buffing wheel mandril mounted




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 Posted: Thu Nov 21st, 2019 01:11 am
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Jim Roadt
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Final step
Give up ....use buffer and dremel




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 Posted: Thu Nov 21st, 2019 01:55 am
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Richard Daugird
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Looks pretty good Jim, especially for a first try. From my VERY limited experience polishing brass, it is an art, not a science. Guys like Ted, Lane, Mike Petree, to name a few who's examples I personally own, make me realize I have a lot to learn.

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 Posted: Thu Nov 21st, 2019 02:56 am
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Todd Adornato
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Lane Shirey wrote: Coarse wire wheel for grinding paint off of Emerson’s

I tried this a couple times, but I find the reverse electrolysis bath to work much better.   Certainly requires a lot less skill!

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 Posted: Thu Nov 21st, 2019 02:59 pm
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Steven P Dempsey
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Wow, I would never have the stones to take a cast 6 winger to a stationary buffing wheel, one slip . . .

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 Posted: Thu Nov 21st, 2019 04:55 pm
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Joel Schmid
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I have had very good results with one of these :




Chucked into a cordless drill.
I use heavy cut buffing compound from Harbor freight to get all the old brown patina, corrosion, and lacquer off first.
Rinse out ball.
Then I go after it with Wrights brass polish on the ball. Very easy to control RPMs, pattern, and motion across blades.
I have done both 4 wing and 6 wing blades.
I am able to get a mirror finish using this technique.

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 Posted: Mon Nov 25th, 2019 11:18 pm
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Jim Roadt
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or switch to 4 blades only

Any suggestions for removing last little bits of compound near rivets?


I have used a T shirt but, even that seems to leave little scratches...see pic






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 Posted: Tue Nov 26th, 2019 12:43 am
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Peter Buffo
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Jim Roadt wrote: or switch to 4 blades only

Any suggestions for removing last little bits of compound near rivets?


I have used a T shirt but, even that seems to leave little scratches...see pic







I use a microfiber cloth and my fingernail on tight spots. 

Or, take two steps back..... you’re way to close to that fan.:)

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 Posted: Tue Nov 26th, 2019 03:51 am
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Nathan Britt
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Dremel with felt wheels https://www.amazon.com/WEN-2305-Rotary-Tool

Last edited on Tue Nov 26th, 2019 03:52 am by Nathan Britt

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 Posted: Tue Nov 26th, 2019 04:23 am
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David A Cherry
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this is just my two cents... I use Maguires cut 105 in the very tight places.. I have tried all the others and so far this is the best..

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 Posted: Sat Nov 30th, 2019 03:25 pm
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Dan Robillard
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I use Wizards Motorcycle Polish for the finished look. For the tight spots I use an electric burr grinder with an assortment of wheels for whatever spot i'm in. It also helps to use a foot operated speed control on your grinder. I find it works great in the tight spots and gives you the control you need.

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