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Brass Drive Rivets  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:41 am
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Dustin Meyer
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Does anyone know where to buy the small drive rivets to attach ID tags and switch plates?

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 09:03 am
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Steve Cunningham
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Those are called escutcheon pins. McMaster-Carr has them.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:01 pm
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Tim Marks
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Dustin-

If your'e referring to the rivets which hold down a serial number plate on a GE, these are not escutcheon pins. To make the GE style pins, I would start with a 1/8" round head rivet then cut the end to a point with a razor or grind it down gently with a sander. When I restore the GE's I always do my best to save these because they can be re-used.

Pretty sure most other fans use the escutcheon pins which can be purchased at McMaster as Steve said.

T

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:07 pm
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John Fengel
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You can also use "Drive Screws" from McMaster.com. Enter Drive Screw in the search box. These are made from steel and you tap them in with a hammer. Measure the hole size and compare on the charts on their web site. You may have to open the hole slightly for correct fit.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:10 pm
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Mike Lackey
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Steve Cunningham wrote:
Those are called escutcheon pins. McMaster-Carr has them.

Yea they have them but not in brass, I have been looking for them for a while without luck in Brass.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:10 pm
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Mike Lackey
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Steve Cunningham wrote:
Those are called escutcheon pins. McMaster-Carr has them.

If anyone knows where to find them in Brass Please pray tell, I have been using different size brass brads, Split tail rivets and of course save the existing ones when ever possible

Last edited on Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:14 pm by Mike Lackey

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:23 pm
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Dustin Meyer
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I've seen the steel drive pins on McMaster Carr but I'm looking for brass. I need them for fastening the data plate on a coin op where there are blind holes. I can buck soild rivets where there is a thru hole. These are not escutcheon pins which are basically finish nails. I know they exist or at least used to because I have removed them from data and switch plates in the past.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 06:44 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Drive screws (technichally Round Type U Drive Screws) work but removing them is very hard. In addition they're always made of steel. You can reuse the original pins by tapping the body of the pins with a screwdriver. It makes the body large enough to stay in the hole.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 08:05 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Here's a Century tag with drive pins. I don't know if the pins are brass or steel.

Attached Image (viewed 1668 times):

Century S2-9%22 tag & drive pins.jpeg

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 08:10 pm
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Mike Lackey
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The ones I have pulled look to be brass and some steel, maybe they are brass plated ????

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 08:12 pm
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Randy Rohr
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I use rivets when I have to. Seems easier to acquire a variety of styles and shank sizes than for e-pins.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 08:16 pm
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Mike Lackey
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I'm learning that, THANKS TO YOU GIVING ME THAT insight, thanks Randy!!! But it would be nice to find those. I have upped the size on a few holes now and in 50 years from now whoever rebuilds them from me will have no clue what was original or altered :)
:eyes

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 08:36 pm
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Craig Cammarata
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google  Jay-Cee Sales and Rivet Inc. or Hanson rivets. They both sell Drive screws. I actually use tiny 2-56 and 4-40 brass screws to hold my motor tags on. I actually tap the holes with those size taps on the Emerson fans I do. It's not original but I think it looks nice and its easy to get the tag back off if it became necessary. Just my 2 cents....

Craig

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 08:38 pm
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Mike Lackey
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Thanks I'll try those as well, I do see the benifit of being able to take the tags off from time to time.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 11:35 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Here's a source. Just nip off the pin to the link you need. You can also search brass brads.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 12:59 am
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Russ Huber
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Mike Lackey wrote:
Steve Cunningham wrote:
Those are called escutcheon pins. McMaster-Carr has them.

Yea they have them but not in brass, I have been looking for them for a while without luck in Brass.


http://www.mcmaster.com/#escutcheon-pins/=lnyc03

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 04:12 am
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Steve Cunningham
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Mr. Big Thumbs here failed to attach the links. McMaster-Carr has them. Just look under Escutcheon Pins. Escutcheon Pins have a slightly domed head.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 08:48 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Dustin's original question is where to buy drive pins. All the alternative suggestions are good but he may be looking only for "drive pins" which are not escutcheon pins, brads, or rivets, all of which would work fine but not if Dustin wants to use the original fastener.

At one time I searched for brass drive pins, drive screws and don't remember if I found any or not. I remember it being hard to find if I ever did and I can find no information saved on my computer showing where they might be available.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 10:11 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Thank you. I have been around a very long time. In addition, from 1967 to 2002 my sole means of employment was selling fasteners.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 10:14 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Steve I have never sold a drive pin. Star Expansion made a 'Pin Grip' for masonary. They were made of lead with a pin coming out of the head. Driving the pin in, caused the body to swell. They also once made drive screws, used in wood.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 10:37 pm
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Steve Stephens
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A little bit of information here on "Hammer Drive Rivets" or "easy drive screw nails". There seems to be a lot of confusion as to what exactly to call them.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general-archive/anyone-know-source-these-pins-87460/

Steve, I recall the "drive rivets" you mentioned with the protruding pin that you hammer down to spread the bottom of the rivet. I got a sample from a parts vender at the c.1953 NY Auto Show where, at that time I believe, they were a new item. My Dad let me have the sample plate with three drive pins in various states of being driven plus loose and said "I bet you will lose it" but I still have it.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 10:44 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Those are Round Type U Drive Screws. Their primary usage was to attach nameplates to machinery. Most manufacturers went to adhesives later.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2013 11:24 pm
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Dustin Meyer
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Okay gents I'm sorry for bringing this up in the first place, I certainly didn't want this to lead to any hard feelings. It's all samantics at this point, all I need some small brass fasteners whether they are called rivets, escutcheon pins, finish nails, or anything else. It will all work out in the end and I only need 4 of them in the first place. I assume we all are working on these old fans for some of the same reasons. We all have our own ideas about how to go about our work and there is no right or wrong and we should all respect the other guy's right to do as he wishes with his fan. Personally I joined AFCA to take advantage of the knowledge, advice and expertise of the members who have been doing this a while. So far I have been helped by a number of members with parts, diagrams, tips and techniques and more. Kim Frank is helping me with a coin op fan by providing parts and advice because as a novice I need his help. However what I don't like to see on the forum is members being critical of other members because they don't like what they did or didn't do to a restoration. I don't recall seeing any forum rules that dictate how a fan must be restored or painted or anything else. So lets all play nice and have respect for the other guy. This is the USA and within reason we can do what we want, when we want, and how we want, and that applies to fans as well. As the old saying goes if you can't say something nice don't say anthing at all.

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 12:11 am
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Steve Cunningham
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Try these guys:

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/mobileportal/show_product.do?pid=1943

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 12:14 am
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Steve Cunningham
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I just did a search for "escutcheon pins" and found lots of suppliers.

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 02:54 am
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Michael Mirin
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where do you find a screw for a Eskimo gearbox?:D

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 07:36 pm
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Ken Rodoni
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Michael Mirin wrote:
where do you find a screw for a Eskimo gearbox?:D


The big screw or little screw? :?

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 08:15 pm
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Michael Mirin
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I hate to see if it was an Emerson!:shock:

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 09:24 pm
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Mike Lackey
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So what about those brass escutions, brads, rivets, little brass thingies that hold on name plates, yea the shinny gold looking things yea! Anyhone know where to find the brass ones ?

Last edited on Fri Mar 1st, 2013 09:24 pm by Mike Lackey

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 09:49 pm
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Russ Huber
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Russ Huber wrote:
Mike Lackey wrote:
Steve Cunningham wrote:
Those are called escutcheon pins. McMaster-Carr has them.

Yea they have them but not in brass, I have been looking for them for a while without luck in Brass.


http://www.mcmaster.com/#escutcheon-pins/=lnyc03


Hey Mike, the Mcmaster link above has BRASS escutcheon pins. I copied the page from the link for you below. I don't know why you keep insisting they don't have them, or you can't find them, but they are there for real. If you follow down from the stainless steel you will see the word ....brass.:)

Decorative Finishing Nails

Also known as escutcheon pins, these have a domed head for a smooth, finished appearance.

18-8 stainless steel nails have excellent corrosion resistance and may be mildly magnetic. Brass nails are decorative and corrosion resistant.
Lg. Shank Dia. Head
Dia. Pkg.
Qty. Pkg.
18-8 Stainless Steel
3/8" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 475 92154A751 $14.87
3/8" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 250 92154A790 14.87
1/2" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 375 92154A756 14.87
1/2" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 200 92154A798 14.87
1/2" 0.11" (12 ga.) 1/4" 75 92154A894 14.87
5/8" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 175 92154A806 14.87
3/4" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 250 92154A767 14.87
3/4" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 150 92154A814 14.87
3/4" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 75 92154A846 14.87
3/4" 0.11" (12 ga.) 1/4" 50 92154A902 14.87
1" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 200 92154A774 14.87
1" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 100 92154A822 14.87
1" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 50 92154A854 14.87
1 1/4" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 50 92154A862 14.87
1 1/2" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 25 92154A870 14.87
Brass
1/4" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 200 97936A155 4.35
3/8" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 300 97936A109 2.62
3/8" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 200 97936A132 2.70
3/8" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 150 97936A158 3.35
1/2" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 300 97936A112 3.17
1/2" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 200 97936A135 3.33
1/2" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 125 97936A161 3.25
1/2" 0.11" (12 ga.) 1/4" 50 97936A184 10.70
5/8" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 175 97936A138 3.29
3/4" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 250 97936A115 3.48
3/4" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 150 97936A141 3.25
3/4" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 100 97936A167 3.62
3/4" 0.11" (12 ga.) 1/4" 50 97936A189 11.07
1" 0.05" (18 ga.) 1/8" 175 97936A118 2.96
1" 0.06" (16 ga.) 1/8" 100 97936A144 2.83
1" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 75 97936A170 3.60
1 1/4" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 50 97936A173 3.44
1 1/2" 0.08" (14 ga.) 3/16" 25 97936A176 2.04

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 09:57 pm
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Russ Huber
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FWIW....now is really not a good time to have a spat on this website. No Webmaster.....extra load on the moderators and those in charge to take care of the website. The website remains to have technical difficulties. On top of that they need to nail down another Webby. Out of respect, we all need to be good boys and girls. That includes me. :D

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 10:03 pm
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TJ Downey
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Mike Lackey wrote:
So what about those brass escutions, brads, rivets, little brass thingies that hold on name plates, yea the shinny gold looking things yea! Anyhone know where to find the brass ones ?

I got mine from Emmett. He had some in his shop.

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 10:18 pm
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Mike Lackey
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TJ Downey wrote:
Mike Lackey wrote:
So what about those brass escutions, brads, rivets, little brass thingies that hold on name plates, yea the shinny gold looking things yea! Anyhone know where to find the brass ones ?

I got mine from Emmett. He had some in his shop.


Really as in real brass or brass coated?

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2013 11:51 pm
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Michael Mirin
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Good point Russ!:tumbs

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2013 01:10 am
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Michael Rathberger
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Go on vacation for a week and you miss everything around here. Lot less excitment on the golf course I have to say, however, last year I did get chased down the fairway by some overly large individual with a 7 iron. Something about hitting a 215 yard 5 wood onto the green they were putting on...

 

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2013 01:38 am
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Russ Huber
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Michael Rathberger wrote:
Lot less excitment on the golf course I have to say, however, last year I did get chased down the fairway by some overly large individual with a 7 iron.

Well, finish the story. So were you LARGER than him and he caught up to you and put a dent in your head with the 7 iron? :wondering:

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2013 02:46 am
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Tom Dreesen
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http://www.hansonrivet.com/w59.htm

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2013 03:02 am
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TJ Downey
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They were the solid brass type.

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2013 03:04 am
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Tom Dreesen
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Steve Cunningham wrote: Those are Round Type U Drive Screws. Their primary usage was to attach nameplates to machinery. Most manufacturers went to adhesives later.
steel or zinc is all I find; use colored lacquer if you want "brass"

 http://www.smithfast.com/udrivescrew.html

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2013 09:37 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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Well, finish the story. So were you LARGER than him and he caught up to you and put a dent in your head with the 7 iron? :wondering:

Not s lot more to it Russ, I find the best way to handle it is to walk out there and find out what the guy wants. Settles things pretty quick. It was an accident anyway, I was playing to layup 5 yards short of the green, Still don't know how I hit a draw out of a lie with the ball below my feet, but it sure was pretty.

The real story is how I managed to have an eagle putt of 25 feet and walked off with par. Rathberger golf, turn birdies into bogeys, pars into doubles, and eagles into pars all because of a stupid flat club.

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